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Riddle me this:

There should be two, but instead there is three.

I am connected to the concept of you and me.

My first can be left to the right, conspicuously;

It perceives outness as a sense of depravity.

My second is far from an erroneous place;

It is true and is tried to be won in a court case.

My third dictates construction, but does not have a hammer;

It perhaps also rhymes a little bit better.

Supposedly, the first and the second are attached.

Can you guess what I am; can the details be matched?


I made up this riddle for fun. Hope you enjoy!

Hints for the answer are below.


Hint 1:

The first is the shortest with just letters of two,
But the others each have at least two pairs like a barbecue.

Hint 2:

The answer is three words that of which are all nouns,
Though one is also a preposition, so that bears the crown.

But it should not be; rather, it should be a prefix.
The grammar is incorrect — this detail is specific.

Hint 3:

The answer can be found in one of these hints.
Find it and you might at first think it is a misprint.

Though you must first rearrange to have three and not four.
They say, "Grammar is something you must not ignore."

But how is that relevant to this very riddle?
Well, grammar rhymes with hammer — it is quite that simple.

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    $\begingroup$ rot13(Sebz gur svefg uvag, V guvax vg'f gnyxvat nobhg ubj gur yrggref bs gur svefg jbeq ner sebz gur yrggref "g" "j" naq/be "b." Fb znlor, "gb"?) $\endgroup$ – Aryaman Jun 30 '18 at 5:33
  • $\begingroup$ @Aryaman no it is not that. The other lines are also relative. I love your rot13 comment, by the way! :) $\endgroup$ – Mr Pie Jun 30 '18 at 5:35
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    $\begingroup$ You are the master of rhymes ;) $\endgroup$ – TheSimpliFire Jul 1 '18 at 8:42
  • $\begingroup$ @TheSimpliFire thank you very much :) $\endgroup$ – Mr Pie Jul 2 '18 at 2:34
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Here’s my guess:

‘In correct grammar’ There should be two because the grammar is incorrect

It fits all the hints (two double letters and such)

I am connected to the concept of you and me. My first can be left to the right, conspicuously. It perceives outness as a sense of depravity.

It’s ‘in’ as opposite of outness - I’m not completely sure of the other parts

My second is far from an erroneous place. It is true and is tried to be won in a court case.

Correct is far from erroneous and is won in court as ‘proof’

My third dictates construction but does not have a hammer. It perhaps also rhymes a little bit better.

Grammar is the construction equipment of words, and also rhymes with hammer

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  • $\begingroup$ "the" is an article, not a pronoun $\endgroup$ – Destructible Lemon Jul 2 '18 at 0:30
  • $\begingroup$ Ah whoops. Forgive me, I had just woken up when I wrote this. $\endgroup$ – XenoDwarf Jul 2 '18 at 0:31
  • $\begingroup$ Fixed my answer, I am set on this one $\endgroup$ – XenoDwarf Jul 2 '18 at 0:38
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    $\begingroup$ Ah, that’s really good. Wish I spotted it. $\endgroup$ – XenoDwarf Jul 2 '18 at 2:33
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    $\begingroup$ @hagfy that's a common misconception, I was also taught that in primary school. Neither phrase is incorrect, it's the context that matters. 'You and I went to the store' is correct and 'I bought ice cream for you and me' is correct. Basic rule is take out the secondary persons and if it doesn't make sense it's wrong e.g. 'I went to the store' vs 'me went to the store'. In the case of the riddle, 'I am connected to the concept of I' is obviously wrong, while the original is correctly written. Though since we're talking about concepts, both could be correct. $\endgroup$ – XenoDwarf Jul 7 '18 at 11:14
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Giving it a shot( though a partial one)

It can be about constructing a meaningful and grammatically correct sentence in English

As,

There should be two, but instead there is three.

This refers to genders - ideally masculine and feminine but we have neutral as well.

I am connected to the concept of you and me.

This is for pronoun s

My first can be left to the right, conspicuously.

This can refer to law of proximity in English grammar, with respect to association of an object/subject to the prior used verb.

It perceives outness as a sense of depravity.

Construction of a proper sentence( with the correct and appropriate use of nouns, verbs, tenses, adjectives, articles, subjects, objects, punctuation, apostrophes etc. - in short grammatically correct and making sense ) is not a simple task.

My second is far from an erroneous place.

This may refer to inappropriate use of subject in a sentence.

It is true and is tried to be won in a court case.

It can be an article ( like a by-law), which triumphs (presumably) and also used in constructing sentences ( which are a, an, the).

My third dictates construction but does not have a hammer.

It could be grammar / rules Or laws - which are applicable while constructing a sentence or for proper rule of a nation( based on the hint)

It perhaps also rhymes a little bit better.

Refer the above.

Supposedly, the first and the second are attached.

To be provided.

_

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ "This refers to genders - ideally masculine and feminine but we have neutral as well." bitch what $\endgroup$ – Destructible Lemon Jul 2 '18 at 0:34

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