3
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Set A

7      3      3      
4      0      2      
8      7      1      

8      7      1      
8      8      7      
6      2      2      

9      8      3      
4      1      0      
1      3      3      


Set B

3      8      3      
4      1      0      
1      3      9      

1      3      3      
4      0      2      
8      7      7      

2      7      1      
8      8      7      
6      2      8      


I am trying to find the relationships / patterns between the arrays of the same set.

I have tried the following strategy:

  • Number of odd and even numbers
  • Sums of rows, columns and diagonals
  • Number of different symbols in each table
  • Range of numbers
  • Patterns of numbers in different corners, in crossed shaped

But didn't get my ah-ah moment.

I found out that two item in different sets are relatively close to each other but except that two cells are swapped:


Set A

8      7      1      
8      8      7      
6      2      2      


Set B

2      7      1      
8      8      7      
6      2      8      

One rule I found out if that in Set A the top-left corner is made up of numbers which belong to the second half of number between [0, 10]: 7, 8, 9 While in Set B, it is the first half: 1, 2, 3

I am curious if someone can figure other rules / links / relationships?

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  • $\begingroup$ What is the goal of finding the patterns? Is there supposed to be some kind of meaning behind it? Or is it just some practice to find patterns? Might the order of which of the two sets are similar (A1:B2, A2:B3, A3:B1) be useful? $\endgroup$ – user49800 Jun 13 '18 at 5:59
4
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I guess I found it

Set A is the input set and whole Set B is generated from Set B. The hint you found about two cells in A2 is being swapped in B3 is valid on all tables but each table on Set A corresponds to next table on Set B

the rule is

You swap the top-left cell and bottom-right cell of A1 and get the B2, you do the same for A2 and get the B3 and finally do the same for A3 and get B1.

Hint if you didn't read the answer & want to do it yourself

I started by thinking why is 5 lacking in both sets etc. But the puzzle is way too much cheaper than that. think shallow.

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