5
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Find the rule specified in the image below. Make sure the rule fully satisfies.

is it enough?

Part two and one

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  • $\begingroup$ Are these all coming from the same caterpillar logic app? $\endgroup$ – boboquack May 16 '18 at 7:21
  • $\begingroup$ @boboquack No, it's not. $\endgroup$ – u_ndefined May 16 '18 at 8:19
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    $\begingroup$ Are each line verifying the logic independently? $\endgroup$ – Untitpoi May 16 '18 at 8:42
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I don't know if it's the rule, but I found a rule that satisfies both the true and false examples:

If you divide the line in half, each half has at least one full light-blue square

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  • $\begingroup$ Depending on how you handle rounding, your approach won't work correctly with False (2) and (3). $\endgroup$ – Orphevs May 16 '18 at 8:07
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    $\begingroup$ @Orphevs I don't think rounding applies, CaptainPlanet says "one XXXX xxxxx-xxxx square" where XXXX is the key word here. $\endgroup$ – boboquack May 16 '18 at 8:29
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    $\begingroup$ @boboquack - nice inline spoilering, though it took me more than one re-read to get it :-) $\endgroup$ – Phylyp May 16 '18 at 14:00
1
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How about

Each line must have at least 2 blue square with a limit of 2 consecutive color

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  • $\begingroup$ False 2,3, and 7 match this rule though, meaning it cant be that. $\endgroup$ – Ryan May 16 '18 at 16:47
1
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I think this pretty much fits:

If there are more lightblue squares, than other colored ones in a line, the next line must be longer than the actual line, otherwise the next line must be 1 square shorter.

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    $\begingroup$ For these types of rule puzzles, I believe the lines need to be analyzed independently (that is, the rule needs to apply to each line in a vacuum) $\endgroup$ – CaptainPlanet May 16 '18 at 18:15
0
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The rules are:

There must be more than one blue square in a line, each half of a line containing atleast one blue square, and not more than two blue squares should come together in a line.

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  • $\begingroup$ I believe the idea is there is only one rule $\endgroup$ – Jon.G May 16 '18 at 10:40
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    $\begingroup$ @Jon.G just glue the rules with and... $\endgroup$ – CiaPan May 16 '18 at 11:08
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    $\begingroup$ IMHO rule 3. follows from 1. unless you meant 'each half'. $\endgroup$ – CiaPan May 16 '18 at 13:17
-3
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Rows of length two (2) cannot contain an orange square.

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  • $\begingroup$ This does not provide an answer to the question. Once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post; instead, provide answers that don't require clarification from the asker. - From Review $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil May 16 '18 at 17:54
  • $\begingroup$ @BeastlyGerbil If you consider the true and false as total grids that follow the rules, rather than collections of rows that each follow the rule, then this answer does identify one of the many, many possible rules to distinguish the grids. You could also view the question slightly differently as "do all rows in this group pass the rule?", in which case one failure would fail the whole category. Either way, this makes sense to me as a full answer, given that the question isn't explicit about how to interpret the grids. Admission: I made the same mistake initially. $\endgroup$ – Joel Harmon May 16 '18 at 22:12
  • $\begingroup$ @BeastlyGerbil actually, logically this is a 100% airtight answer. You obviously have no sense of humour. $\endgroup$ – Nick Hunter May 17 '18 at 14:47

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