6
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I'm part of a whole

Re-united we are none

Something yet nothing

What am I?

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  • $\begingroup$ This is my first post on Puzzling StackExchange. Constructive criticisms are gladly welcomed. $\endgroup$ – Isfaaq May 8 '18 at 12:54
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    $\begingroup$ I have a feeling this is too broad, I already have 3 or 4 answers in my mind... $\endgroup$ – Gustavo Gabriel May 8 '18 at 12:57
  • $\begingroup$ @GustavoGabriel I added another line. I hope it helps. It is related to the first line. $\endgroup$ – Isfaaq May 8 '18 at 13:05
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Gonna give it a try:

Antimatter

Because:

Its part of the whole universe, reunited with matter both dissapear, it is both something and an origin for nothingness

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  • $\begingroup$ Right on. That's what I was thinking about. $\endgroup$ – Isfaaq May 8 '18 at 13:20
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    $\begingroup$ If that's the answer, then "Re-united we are none" really bothers me. Upon annihilation, all of the mass energy from the two particles still exists, it's just in a different form. And a form that could reform back into a particle/anti-particle pair upon scattering. $\endgroup$ – Shufflepants May 8 '18 at 19:28
  • $\begingroup$ I gave that answer coz I believed literally nothing exists after the union. Would you happen to know if the physics knowledge about this has changed in the past years? Anyway I find the quote correct, for the particles emselves are none afterwards. $\endgroup$ – Jorge.V May 9 '18 at 6:17
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I guess you are

a semi-circle

Because

I'm part of a whole

more specifically, half of one

Re-united we are none

With the other half, you form a circle, or $0$

Something yet nothing

A semi-circle is something as it is a shape, but it is also nothing as it has no basis in the real world.

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0
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As I said in my comment, I think this is too broad, so here it is:

Planet Earth

Explanation:

Part of a whole galaxy
Permeating in a void
It's something, yet nothing in the vast universe

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    $\begingroup$ You are looking from the right "scale". Please have a look at the edited version. $\endgroup$ – Isfaaq May 8 '18 at 13:08
0
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There can be uncountable number of answers.
Any set of numbers with sum of zero checks out.
Example: $\{1, -1, 2, -2, \pi, -\pi\}$

Part other whole = part of the set.
Together cancels out into zero.
Numbers are abstract concepts so they are nothing.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Puzzling SE! I have added a spoiler tag to your answer using >!. $\endgroup$ – noedne May 8 '18 at 19:30

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