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cureent progress on puzzle

I can't seem to find a next step to logically come to without guesswork. Any ideas on how to move forward?

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  • $\begingroup$ That's not really a puzzle and you have 1 reputation. Have you really just registered here to ask for a help on a single kenken? That's true determination I see here. $\endgroup$ Apr 24, 2018 at 9:38
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    $\begingroup$ @ThomasBlue Questions about how to go about solving a type of puzzle, even in reference to a specific example, are on topic. And everyone started somewhere. :) $\endgroup$
    – Rubio
    Apr 24, 2018 at 11:29
  • $\begingroup$ R Stig, Welcome to Puzzling! (Take the Tour!) I hope you stay awhile :) $\endgroup$
    – Rubio
    Apr 24, 2018 at 11:30

2 Answers 2

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First off: guesswork is an acceptable way to move through a puzzle (at least, while you manage to hold it inside your head). Sometimes it's worthy to plan several steps ahead.

But, if it goes against your principles, you could use some math instead:

Two right columns consist of five different pieces (with three fully and two partially inside). The sum of these pieces is 7+7+3+6+11=34. At the same time, sum of numbers inside the columns would be (1+2+3+4+5)*2=30. That gives you sum of 34-30=4 on three outstepping cells; which can be reached only as 1+2+1.

Thus, cell (1,3) would contain a '1' and cell (4,4) would contain a '3'. This might be enough of a boost for you :)

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you so much! I'm not completely against using guesswork (if I'm down to two choices for a cell I'll often test one in my head and see if it makes a contradiction), I just tend to make mistakes or forget my tentative work after 2-3 steps, so "math" solutions appeal to me :) $\endgroup$
    – vball
    Apr 24, 2018 at 9:42
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A somewhat simpler way forward than what Thomas suggested is to ask yourself...

where can a 5 fit in column 4? It can't fit anywhere inside the 7+ piece contained in columns 4 and 5, since the remaining cells would both have to be 1, which won't work in any configuration here. Therefore, it has to go in the bottom cell of column 4. This means that the 6+ piece in the bottom row can only be filled with a 2 and 4, leading to a 3 in the leftmost cell of the bottom row and a 1 in the rightmost cell. A number of other things easily fall into place after that.

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