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TWO came forth from the very same mother
and most people could not tell one from the other
They arrived the same day, on the very same spot,
they look just the same, yet twins they are not

To further explain this perhaps I should say
that one of these two was given away
In fact both were wanted, it just was not fair
that they had to abandon one half of this pair

But fate has a way of bringing together
those things torn apart by unfavourable weather
The one not abandoned broke free from the mother
and managed to find its own way to the other

Those who were present right at the start
may have a way to tell them apart
but although they didn't want either to leave
having found them both, only one can they retrieve.

Can you name the two?


Clue 1:

To help you along the first clue I shall give
is to tell you the mother is figurative
What she actually is (and yes, she's a she!)
May be mentioned with mother collectively.

Clue 2:

It may help you further if I were to add
that although there's a mother, there isn't a dad
For even though this nameless two she did carry
she only heard others speak of time to marry.

Clue 3:

The figurative mother's a "she" in this tale
so it must be a thing that's regarded female
I've told you the word may be said alongside
the word mother, so tell me, which words you have tried?

The second clue starts out with little to add -
if the mother's symbolic then of course there's no dad!
The help that is found for this riddle of mine
is some dextrous wordplay within the last line.

Once you identify "mother" it's given
towards the right answer you'll quickly be driven
A little thought will help you to win the cup
and be known as a winner, not simply "washed up".

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  • 8
    $\begingroup$ This is a masterpiece $\endgroup$ – Midori Apr 23 '18 at 16:52
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    $\begingroup$ It's nice to see rhymes with actual metre for a change! Well-written; thanks! $\endgroup$ – GentlePurpleRain Apr 23 '18 at 17:09
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    $\begingroup$ They are two of triplets! Oh, wait. That's a different puzzle. $\endgroup$ – Dr Xorile Apr 23 '18 at 20:42
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Is it:

Flotsam and Jetsam

TWO came forth from the very same mother and most people could not tell one from the other They arrived the same day, on the very same spot, they look just the same, yet twins they are not

Both flotsam and jetsam come from a ship (which are referred to as female. Also Mother Ship. Thank you to @DrXorile and @noedne for this one). They are both washed up debris, and so appear the same, and if there is a shipwreck, they will be created at the same time. However, flotsam and jetsam differ by how they are deposited in the sea (flotsam is unintentionally deposited, either due to falling overboard accidentally or as the result of a shipwreck, while jetsam is the result of intentional depositing, usually to avoid disaster in some way)

To further explain this perhaps I should say that one of these two was given away In fact both were wanted, it just was not fair that they had to abandon one half of this pair

Jetsam was given away. Both were wanted, but the jetsam had to be given up to avert a disaster while the flotsam was retained until the ship met its watery fate.

But fate has a way of bringing together those things torn apart by unfavourable weather The one not abandoned broke free from the mother and managed to find its own way to the other

The disaster was not averted (likely by a storm), and the ship wrecked, resulting in flotsam. Now the flotsam and jetsam float together.

Those who were present right at the start may have a way to tell them apart but although they didn't want either to leave having found them both, only one can they retrieve.

Only those present before and during the disaster know which were intentionally thrown overboard as jetsam, and so could tell them apart. By maritime law, only flotsam can be retrieved by the original owner, while jetsam is the property of whomever discovers it

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    $\begingroup$ Very good. I would say perhaps (ROT13): zbgure fuvc engure guna zbgure angher $\endgroup$ – Dr Xorile Apr 27 '18 at 19:04
  • $\begingroup$ You have the correct answer! Although the mother is not the sea, nor mother nature. You've mentioned it already... everything else is pretty much bob on, if you can tweak it I'll mark it as the accepted answer! $\endgroup$ – Astralbee Apr 27 '18 at 19:21
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    $\begingroup$ I suppose ROT13(fuvcf ner ersreerq gb hfvat srznyr cebabhaf). $\endgroup$ – noedne Apr 27 '18 at 19:51
  • $\begingroup$ Brilliant! Congratulations on solving! $\endgroup$ – Astralbee Apr 27 '18 at 20:46
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    $\begingroup$ I had been watching the puzzle since it was posted and couldn't figure it until the third clue. Between ROT13(jnfurq hc) and ROT13(qrkgebhf jbeqcynl jvguva gur ynfg yvar) referring to ROT13(gvzr gb zneel - znevgvzr), it finally clicked. Thanks for a great puzzle that kept me thinking for days! $\endgroup$ – cpcodes Apr 27 '18 at 20:51
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They are

matter and antimatter.

TWO came forth from the very same mother
and most people could not tell one from the other
They arrived the same day, on the very same spot,
they look just the same, yet twins they are not

Matter and antimatter were created by the Big Bang (mother nature). They look identical, but they are not because they have opposite charges.

To further explain this perhaps I should say
that one of these two was given away
In fact both were wanted, it just was not fair
that they had to abandon one half of this pair

In the early universe, baryogenesis caused matter to dominate antimatter.

But fate has a way of bringing together
those things torn apart by unfavourable weather
The one not abandoned broke free from the mother
and managed to find its own way to the other

People (matter) created particle accelerators that create antimatter artificially (without mother nature).

Those who were present right at the start
may have a way to tell them apart
but although they didn't want either to leave
having found them both, only one can they retrieve.

Matter and antimatter cannot coexist because they annihilate upon collision.

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    $\begingroup$ If antimatter and matter find each other they will not coexist nor could one of them leave. The continued existence of the mother who is abandoned is also problematic. $\endgroup$ – Dr Xorile Apr 23 '18 at 20:42
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    $\begingroup$ Another great attempt! Not correct I'm afraid. $\endgroup$ – Astralbee Apr 24 '18 at 9:21
3
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I am very bad at this and english is not my primary language. I'm pretty sure it's not the right answer but I think it goes in the right direction from some points :

They are

To drops of water.

TWO came forth from the very same mother

I'm keeping the idea that the mother is mother nature, earth

and most people could not tell one from the other They arrived the same day, on the very same spot, they look just the same, yet twins they are not

In french we have a saying : "se ressembler comme deux gouttes d'eau", meaning "to look alike like two drops of water", but I'm not sure it's the same saying in english (peas in a pod I think)

To further explain this perhaps I should say that one of these two was given away In fact both were wanted, it just was not fair that they had to abandon one half of this pair

one drop of water was taken, I have no clear idea here, before few lines after

But fate has a way of bringing together those things torn apart by unfavourable weather

Unfavourable weather, evaporation, rain, ... and hear goes one of the water drop

The one not abandoned broke free from the mother and managed to find its own way to the other

the other drop managed evaporate into a cloud (leaving mother earth) and find his way to his water drop buddy

Those who were present right at the start may have a way to tell them apart but although they didn't want either to leave having found them both, only one can they retrieve.

Two water drops in contact will become one.

The hints seems both to be about the mother part, which I still believe is Mother earth.

I know it's a stretch and probably not the good answer as too many parts of the text don't give much sense. But as we take the mother as earth, the part about the weather and the pair torn apart and all, all I see is something around that.

We might have to go smaller, it could be molecules, like O2, some weather events could break the molecule in half, some liquid to gas change or something happening. Well, I'm going too far, hope I might at least help someone go in the right direction, or maybe I'm just too far il the wrong one :D

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ A great answer, and glad to see you have tried to think about more of the lines, as every line of the poem adds detail. Not correct, sadly! $\endgroup$ – Astralbee Apr 26 '18 at 15:47
2
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I doubt that this is the answer, but here goes:

Two arrows in Robin Hood's quiver

TWO came forth from the very same mother and most people could not tell one from the other They arrived the same day, on the very same spot, they look just the same, yet twins they are not

The two arrows made by the fletcher looked extremely similar.

To further explain this perhaps I should say that one of these two was given away In fact both were wanted, it just was not fair that they had to abandon one half of this pair

Robin shot the first arrow into the center bullseye.

But fate has a way of bringing together those things torn apart by unfavourable weather The one not abandoned broke free from the mother and managed to find its own way to the other

Robin shot the second arrow into the first arrow, splitting it down the middle.

Those who were present right at the start may have a way to tell them apart but although they didn't want either to leave having found them both, only one can they retrieve.

The first arrow is split and destroyed and cannot be retrieved. However, the "didn't want either to leave" thing suggests that this is the wrong answer. Perhaps the fletcher regarded the arrows as a work of art that she didn't want shot.

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Interesting! Incorrect but still great. ;) $\endgroup$ – Astralbee Apr 24 '18 at 7:29

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