13
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I’ll try another Riley...

My prefix is a unit
My infix relates units
My suffix is found on shore
My whole always makes more
Bonus: My uffix is my whole

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16
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I think the answer is

Ampersand

My prefix is a unit

Amp, short for ampere, unit of electric current

My infix relates units

Per, e.g, kilometres per hour

My suffix is found on shore

Sand

My whole always makes more

The use of "&" implies there's more to come.

My uffix is my whole

And is equivalent to &,

as @Fifth_H0r5eman points out "uffix" is the end of suffix so this works.

also, as @Rubio points out, "uffix" is suffix without the 's', the same as sand/and.

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I think "Uffix" was intentional, since it is the end of suffix $\endgroup$ – Fifth_H0r5eman Apr 19 '18 at 14:06
  • $\begingroup$ @Fifth_H0r5eman I take your point, I've edited appropriately. $\endgroup$ – hexomino Apr 19 '18 at 14:08
  • $\begingroup$ Everything is right. The reason “uffix” is intentional is just slightly more specific. $\endgroup$ – tyobrien Apr 19 '18 at 14:15
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    $\begingroup$ "uffix" is "suffix" without the first "S". $\endgroup$ – Rubio Apr 19 '18 at 14:16
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    $\begingroup$ The "always" on the fourth line bothers me quite unreasonably much: in many (most?) programming languages, the whole happens to be the symbol for the bitmask (bitwise AND) operation, which is typically only used on unsigned integer values. In that use, it never ever gives a result that is more than either of the operands. $\endgroup$ – Bass Apr 19 '18 at 19:26

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