15
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My prefix has a value when defined

My infix has value when it's refined

My suffix is not usually moved

My whole is after something's been removed

What am I?

Hint 1:

If you steal my infix, you may end up at my suffix.

Hint 2:

Same answer but not necessarily the same prefix/suffix/infix:


My prefix does not play but is part of the game

My suffix is a place for passengers of a train

My infix is shouted as warning of danger overhead

My whole can make a specific type of bed

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10
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I think the answer is

Reforestation

My prefix has a value when defined

Ref is a reference wrapper in C++.

My infix has value when it's refined

Ore is a naturally occurring solid material from which a metal or valuable mineral can be extracted profitably.

My suffix is not usually moved

A station is usually fixed by definition.

My whole is after something's been removed

Reforestation is the planting of a forest after being removed.

Hint 1

If you steal my infix, you may end up at my suffix

I think this means that the clearing of a forest can lead to the building of a station.

Hint 2

My prefix does not play but is part of the game

Ref is short for referee

My suffix is a place for passengers of a train

Station (as in train station)

My infix is shouted as warning of danger overhead

Golfers shout 'Fore' to warn about their incoming shots

My whole can make a specific type of bed

A seed-bed

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This sounds plausible, but I think you have one letter too many in your first infix. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Apr 9 '18 at 9:30
  • $\begingroup$ @GarethMcCaughan okay I'm willing to accept that. Do you think the same reasoning applies? $\endgroup$ – hexomino Apr 9 '18 at 10:15
  • $\begingroup$ The answer is correct but the first infix is incorrect. @GarethMcCaughan is correct in there being one too many letters. The reasoning should require no wordplay. The first hint has a different reasoning as well. $\endgroup$ – wolfram42 Apr 9 '18 at 11:49
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Ah, sorry! I thought @GarethMcCaughan was talking about the other letter. I've edited my answer now. Thanks. $\endgroup$ – hexomino Apr 9 '18 at 12:00
4
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I think this isn't the answer, but I've come up so far with

Impastation

My prefix has a value when defined

Im - by definition, imaginary numbers have a value when an "imaginary number" is defined, otherwise we cannot assign value to them

My infix has value when it's refined

pas - para-aminosalicylic acid, used for creating a drug to treat tuberculosis. Otherwise has no "value" to us.

My suffix is not usually moved & Hint 1

Stations aren't usually moved. Also because of the 1st hint: If you steal my infix, you may end up at my suffix means that you'll end up at the police station upon the accusation of theft.

My whole is after something's been removed

Making a paste out of something usually means that you'll get rid of components which would ruin its texture.

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Not bad, the suffix is correct as long as the reason behind the first hint. Nice interpretation for the other 2. $\endgroup$ – wolfram42 Apr 9 '18 at 12:47
2
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I think the solution is:

carbondioxide (CO2)

My prefix has a value when defined

You can put a number before it. It then has a value.

My infix has value when it's refined

Refined Carbon is diamond

My suffix is not usually moved

Suffix is dioxide. Oxygen isn't usually moved

My whole is after something's been removed

If Oxygen is removed (breathing) you get CO2

Hint 1

If you steal my infix, you may end up at my suffix

Trees remove carbon(dioxide) from the air and add oxygen

I know it's not a perfect solution. My answer was posted before he added the second hit.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice answer but there are a few issues. Carbon dioxide can be achieved by removing hydrogen, not oxygen. I am not sure how Oxygen is not moved, it is primarily a gas and is always moving. So this is not the answer I'm looking for. $\endgroup$ – wolfram42 Apr 9 '18 at 1:57
  • $\begingroup$ @wolfram42 You remove oxygen when breathing which creates carbondioxide. I knew the moving of oxygen wasn't correct, but the other things were so I wanted to add it anyway. $\endgroup$ – Martin W Apr 9 '18 at 10:11
  • $\begingroup$ The breathing reaction is 6O2 + C6H12O6 = 6CO2 + 6H2O so it depends on your perspective. I can see how that could be removal, but I think of it as addition. Since you are removing oxygen from the carbohydrate. $\endgroup$ – wolfram42 Apr 9 '18 at 11:50

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