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Ram has wandered into a forest. He sees a herd of elephants nearby the lake. He counts the number of trunks he can see which comes upto 30. He calls up his friend and tells "Today I saw 34 heads of elephants in the forest".

Can you explain how he told that?

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  • $\begingroup$ This is poorly worded. It should be something like "Can you explain why he wrote that?" Phrasing it as "Can you explain how he came to that conclusion?" means that you are asking how Ram came to believe that he saw 34 heads, but in the answer you accepted, he does not in fact believe that he saw 34 heads. $\endgroup$ Apr 4, 2018 at 20:05
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    $\begingroup$ Judging from the accepted answer this question is too broad; there are several just-as-valid answers and no way of figuring out which one is correct. Voting to close. 169. $\endgroup$
    – Bass
    Apr 4, 2018 at 20:22
  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of My cousin's odd farm $\endgroup$ Apr 4, 2018 at 21:03
  • $\begingroup$ Modified it to be understood better $\endgroup$
    – Nappa
    Apr 5, 2018 at 1:31
  • $\begingroup$ Now it's not broken. It is, alas, still too broad. $\endgroup$
    – Rubio
    Apr 5, 2018 at 6:46

2 Answers 2

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It is

The number of fore-heads of each elephant.

Since

There are 30 elephants there are 30-fore heads.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice ,that was quick $\endgroup$
    – Nappa
    Apr 4, 2018 at 18:46
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    $\begingroup$ @PavanNittur Why then would he write (literally) "Today I saw 34 heads of elephants in the forest" — quotation marks from the original, indicating that's literally what was written? The idea suggested by this answer doesn't work with the puzzle as stated. (And I don't really even fault the answer for that ...) $\endgroup$
    – Rubio
    Apr 4, 2018 at 21:20
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    $\begingroup$ This will only work as a spoken question. $\endgroup$
    – Amit Naidu
    Apr 4, 2018 at 21:26
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Because

30 is referring to the number of tree trunks, not elephant trunks.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yep this could also be the answer. $\endgroup$
    – Nappa
    Apr 4, 2018 at 18:47

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