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My question is:

What is the thing which reduces weight when you wet and increases weight when you dry?

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closed as off-topic by JMP, Glorfindel, Rand al'Thor, athin, NL628 Apr 4 '18 at 3:13

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  • $\begingroup$ reduces weight? $\endgroup$ – smriti Apr 3 '18 at 8:38
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    $\begingroup$ sulphur (OR) sugar $\endgroup$ – narasimha Apr 3 '18 at 8:41
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    $\begingroup$ @Evargalo, you are right. Thank you very much. $\endgroup$ – IQ WANTER Apr 3 '18 at 8:45
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    $\begingroup$ I don't understand, how is you being wet or dry influencing that object in any way? maybe you meant when it is wet and when it is dry? $\endgroup$ – Florian Bourse Apr 3 '18 at 13:33
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    $\begingroup$ I am wondering.. 6 answers to puzzle but -3 votes to question? even one answer has 4 upvotes? $\endgroup$ – Preet Apr 4 '18 at 0:27
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Not sure if your choice of wording in this riddle is intentional, but

If read in a specific way, the answer could be anything used by anyone which gets wet when used and is left to dry afterwards, like a towel or a sponge.

Because

It reduces weight after wet (when left to dry) and increases weight after dry (when first used/re-used)

Now after your edit, again sticking to exact wording, it could be

Your body, which reduces weight when you wet (are sweaty from exercising, or when urinating) and increases weight when you dry (stop exercising enough, or have problems urinating)

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as @narasimha mentioned it, it can be

sulphur

as

It has a specific gravity of 2. That means if we weigh it under water, it would have an perceptible weight less than its original.

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  • $\begingroup$ And what about increasing? $\endgroup$ – IQ WANTER Apr 3 '18 at 9:11
  • $\begingroup$ @IQWANTER if weigh under water it weigh less, so if weigh dry, the weight obviously increases, right $\endgroup$ – smriti Apr 3 '18 at 9:36
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I think we are talking about

Apparent weight

From that point of view any object that is:

Submerged in water, i.e. wet will have higher apparent weight due to the buoyancy and will be heavier when out of the water, i.e. dry.

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  • $\begingroup$ I thought the same and was going to write the answer. $\endgroup$ – Ali786 Apr 3 '18 at 13:02
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Well, I haven't seen this as an answer so what about:

A Water Butt

Because

When a Water Butt is used to water the garden, therefore wet, it loses weight as it loses water

But

When the water butt is not being used to water the garden and is therefore dry, because it is not providing water, the water butt becomes heavier as it continues to store any further rainwater.

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This can be

the clouds above you

They lose weight

when it's raining, making you wet

They gain weight

after the rain, when they form again (water condensation), letting you dry

Similarly, this could also be

your water tank that empties when you take a shower and that fills up once you are done.

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Far-fetched

A campfire or a flame

What is the thing which reduces weight when you wet and increases weight when you dry?

Fire has a 'weight'
You put out a campfire by adding water.
If there were wet logs in the campfire, they will dry out and fuel the flames.

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