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Current Best: 13 characters

This time I'm asking you guys to determine the shortest possible grammatically correct english sentence that includes 2 pairs of synonyms (different words that mean the same). For checking character count you can use the site http://www.javascriptkit.com/script/script2/charcount.shtml

To determine if a word is a synonym, it either has to be obvious, or has to be confirmed by thesaurus.com.

The accepted answer will always be changed to adjust to the shortest answer which follows all the rules. So any answer can be bested at any point by another solver!

Here's an example incase any of you are confused;

Characters: 64

What a beautiful, giant flower! Almost as pretty as my big tree!

Beautiful and Pretty; To look good.
Giant and Big; To be large in size.


Please note your answer will not be accepted if it ties the accepted answer!

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  • $\begingroup$ I assure you (especially @xnor) the rules will stay constant. As it's not as hard to make a sentence like this $\endgroup$ – warspyking Dec 20 '14 at 15:48
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    $\begingroup$ 'Not as hard' - indeed, almost too easy IMO. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 20 '14 at 16:01
  • $\begingroup$ Now down to 13... $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 20 '14 at 16:38
  • $\begingroup$ Oi warspy, how come you accept 'go' and 'via' as synonyms but not 'be' and 'am'? :-) $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 21 '14 at 13:05
  • $\begingroup$ I've VTCed this question as 'primarily opinion-based'. It doesn't look like it is, but this is how the OP is judging answers (see here). $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 21 '14 at 16:22
4
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15 Characters

I gaze; see me!

I and me: first person plural pronoun. Gaze and see: use one's visual sense.

14 Characters

I rise; up me!

I and me: first person plural pronoun. Rise and up: increase or raise upwards.

13 Characters

An os, a gob.

*An and a: indefinite article. Os and gob: mouth.

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  • $\begingroup$ One can 'up' one's prices, but can a person be 'upped'? I think so, at least colloquially. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 20 '14 at 16:30
  • $\begingroup$ Move the semicolon one word to the right in that sentence and there can be no objection at all: "I rise up; me!" (Unless you think the parts of speech need to be the same.) (Although thesaurus.com does indeed have "up" listed as a synonym for the verb "rise", so that's probably fine anyways.) $\endgroup$ – Josh Caswell Dec 21 '14 at 20:04
3
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15 Characters

Tell me, I say!

Whether this works depends on whether I and me are considered synonyms, both referring to myself, of course. Clarified as allowed by OP.

25 Characters

Heat drops as temps fall.

Heat and temps: refer to temperature
Drops and fall: to become lower

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice. Defiantly better than 64! $\endgroup$ – warspyking Dec 20 '14 at 15:54
  • $\begingroup$ You edited while I was typing my answer! :-) If things like 'I' and 'me' are allowed, I've got it almost as short as possible. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 20 '14 at 16:00
  • $\begingroup$ I don't see any reason for I and me not to be allowed... $\endgroup$ – warspyking Dec 20 '14 at 16:04
1
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12 characters

Be me? I am.

I know this ties the best answer, but it's also a good one. I and me are both first person singular pronouns, and be and am are both forms of the infinitive to be. This could be a response to the common statement "Be yourself," so it is valid sentence/pair of sentences.

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  • $\begingroup$ I tried this, but couldn't get away with listing 'be' and 'am' as synonyms! :-( $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 20 '14 at 22:22
  • $\begingroup$ @randal'thor Hmm. That's strange, seeing as they're synonyms just as much as I and am are. Oh well, I'll leave it up. $\endgroup$ – mdc32 Dec 20 '14 at 22:26
  • $\begingroup$ You mean I and me! :-) My suggestion was 'I am; be me!', which wasn't allowed since 'am' meant 'exist' and 'be' meant 'become', which weren't synonymous enough for the OP. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 20 '14 at 22:29
  • $\begingroup$ Oops, my bad on that. Makes sense why they aren't synonyms, but can't be be used to mean exist also? $\endgroup$ – mdc32 Dec 20 '14 at 22:30

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