5
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It may be too big to golf with
And that a shortest answer in it exists may be just a myth
But this week we've reached two
We've come a long way from bar and ...
And they've added some things new
Although only a few
One is pretty useful though
Similar to the sharp C we know
But although we will be shorter now
It doesn't matter much anyhow
We will never be able to compete with big short ones
So they will continue their memes and puns
So tell me, what did they add?
And how can this riddle be interpreted?

Answer is a single word, but please explain (almost) each line.

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The answer to the overall question "So tell me, what did they add?"

var

Through most of the riddle, the word "it" refers to:

Java (the programming language).

It may be too big to golf with

Not a particularly good code golfing language to use on Programming Puzzles & Code Golf Stack Exchange.

And that a shortest answer in it exists may be just a myth

Maybe refers to the general difficulty of Kolmogorov complexity? Or maybe, it could just mean that so far Java hasn't been the winner in any major code golf challenges?

But this week we've reached two

Java 10 was just released (and to computers, 10 means two... ?)

We've come a long way from bar and ...

foo would fit here with the rhyming scheme, and from the general usage of foo and bar as meta variable names in computing. Not sure how it applies to Java in particular - but I agree Java has come a long way from its beginnings. I remember when it was largely used in small Java applets embedded into web pages, like the demo applet with the animation of the white triangular cartoon character (can't remember the name, might be misremembering details...).

And they've added some things new / Although only a few

Only a new features in Java 10.

One is pretty useful though / Similar to the sharp C we know

This would likely be "local variable type inference". Just like in C#, this is used by declaring var as the type. That could certainly cut down on the length dedicated to explicit type declarations.

But although we will be shorter now / It doesn't matter much anyhow / We will never be able to compete with big short ones

Still doesn't really make Java 10 compete with the dedicated code golf languages.

So they will continue their memes and puns

Perhaps an oblique reference to the names of some of the dedicated code golf languages? Not sure here.

So tell me, what did they add?

Local variable type inference, in other words, var .

And how can this riddle be interpret?

As @Jordan.J.D pointed out in a comment, Java is largely an interpreted language (or at best JIT compiled) - especially now that GCJ has officially been dropped from the GNU Compiler Collection (and it was pretty much obsolete anyway for a long time before that).

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  • $\begingroup$ Java is interpreted by the JVM. Myth could be this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mythology_of_Indonesia#Java $\endgroup$ – Jordan.J.D Mar 23 '18 at 19:49
  • $\begingroup$ you also skipped the line "We've come a long way from bar and...", which the last word of would be foo $\endgroup$ – Quintec Mar 23 '18 at 19:59
  • $\begingroup$ Great answer, almost everything is correct! +1 from me. As @thecoder16 mentioned, one line is missing. The memes and puns one I will spoil: since Java is so verbose in comparison to golfing languages it's usually made fun of. The part you've wrote about C# is actually correct, except it isn't auto in C#, but ... (this part was actually the biggest tip for the answer I'm actually looking for, since it isn't the word "Java" ;) ). $\endgroup$ – Kevin Cruijssen Mar 23 '18 at 20:31
  • $\begingroup$ @DanielSchepler Everything seems to be correct now (although I had a different one for the final one, but that doesn't matter). Only the answer is wrong. :) Tip: You've already got the answer in one of your other spoiler tags ("So tell me, what did they add?" (no the answer in not in this spoiler block) with a single word as answer.) $\endgroup$ – Kevin Cruijssen Mar 23 '18 at 22:11
  • $\begingroup$ @KevinCruijssen Edited again to address the last comment. $\endgroup$ – Daniel Schepler Mar 23 '18 at 22:20

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