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Frankly, I have no idea.

The first answer which is convincing beyond argument will be accepted.

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    $\begingroup$ This sounds like it's "too broad", but not flagging as I'm too new around here to know. $\endgroup$ – GendoIkari Mar 14 '18 at 18:34
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    $\begingroup$ @gendolkari you’re right, good call :) $\endgroup$ – Quintec Mar 14 '18 at 18:47
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    $\begingroup$ @GendoIkari, I hope the big bosses will have, on this special day, a more rounded approach. $\endgroup$ – ugoren Mar 14 '18 at 18:48
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    $\begingroup$ c'mon mods, have a sense of humor. It's pi day! $\endgroup$ – PopularIsn'tRight Mar 14 '18 at 19:25
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    $\begingroup$ The original shepherd's pie was first created for Queen Elizabeth I and cost 3 pounds 1 shilling and 4 pence. This is well known in the UK, and is the actual reason why 3.14 came to be colloquially known as Pie, and later more formally as Pi. You can find this explanation on the internet. $\endgroup$ – Sentinel Mar 14 '18 at 21:33
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When going to a bakery, a shepherd's pie is when you buy 3 pies and also get a slice of one more to try as a sample.

The tradition goes back to the 16th century. Due to a wool shortage, shepherds in England all became incredibly wealthy. When most people bought pies at a bakery, they could carry at most two pies due to having only two hands. The suddenly well-to-do shepherds could carry a third because they would bring their hired help with them to help carry. Bakeries tried to court these customers by standing outside their shops and offering free samples of their baking. When a shepherd tried a pie he liked, he would stop in the store and buy 3. That three plus the one free slice became known as a "shepherd's pie". Incidentally, this free sample practice is also continued to this day in a store known as "Costco".

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  • $\begingroup$ Is it April 1st? $\endgroup$ – Sentinel Mar 14 '18 at 21:29
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It would be 3.28 because a baker's dozen originated from bakers being nice and giving their customers an extra, so you'd get an extra slice of pi (0.14159)

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  • $\begingroup$ why is the extra slice 0.14159? $\endgroup$ – ugoren Mar 14 '18 at 19:04
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    $\begingroup$ @ugoren You wouldn't give another whole pie, so just cut off a slice 3.14159 $\endgroup$ – pfg Mar 14 '18 at 19:05
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Shepard's pi is the number
3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169141592653589793238462643383279502884197169141592653589793238462643383279502884197169141592653589793238462643383279502884197169141592653589793238462643383279502884197169..

Which looks like it just goes on and on forever, ever changing, but really it's just the same thing repeating.

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