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It's been a while from last time I made a puzzle...
since I used to make one out of certain field, I tried something different here.

Hope you enjoy it!

From a lawyer I was born, from a typesetter I've been torn.

I worked with printers over centuries, and website designers over recent decades.

Inside the pages I did fit, inside the papers I did't eat.

Though I worked from frame to frame, yet my content stayed the same.

If you want to work with me, a simple principle is here to see:

There's no need to find out the things you read, but the picture in your head.

Take a guess, what am I ?

Hint 1:

If a page became a pillow, then the answer is the padding.

Hint 2:

I could be different language in similar pattern, but you may have seen me most in Latin.

Hint 3:

If you actually see me, it might be like a longer, better formed asdfasdf...

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the answer is pretty much ...

Lorem ipsum.

From a lawyer I was born, from a typesetter I've been torn.

A variation of the ordinary lorem ipsum text has been used in typesetting since the 1960s or earlier, when it was popularized by advertisements for Letraset transfer sheets. Regarding that with lawyers,as "Lorem ipsum" text is derived from sections 1.10.33 of Cicero's De finibus bonorum et malorum.Lorem ipsum is the common placeholder text used in graphic design work, is derived from parts of the first book's discourse on hedonism in which Cicero argues against Epicureanism. Epicurus was an early thinker to develop the notion of justice as a social contract. He defined justice as an agreement made by people not to harm each other.The point of living in a society with laws and punishments is to be protected from harm so that one is free to pursue happiness.Because of this, laws that do not contribute to promoting human happiness are not just.

I worked with printers over centuries, and website designers over recent decades.

It is used by printers as dummy texts since the 1500s. And in the regard of web designers, use of Lorem ipsum passages was first popularized on Letraset dry-transfer sheets from the early 1970s, which were produced to be used by graphic designers for filler text.

Inside the pages I did fit, inside the papers I did't eat.

Lorem Ipsum is dummy text which has no meaning however looks very similar to real text i.e. it fits inside the pages and inside the papers it did't eat.

Though I worked from frame to frame, yet my content stayed the same.

Used by printers as dummy texts since the 1500s, the physical source of the lorem ipsum text may be the 1914 Loeb Classical Library Edition of the De Finibus, where the Latin text, presented on the left-hand (even) pages, breaks off on page 34 with "Neque porro quisquam est qui do-" and continues on page 36 with "lorem ipsum ...", suggesting that the galley type of that page was mixed up to make the dummy text seen today. Which means that its content remained same throughout the time.

If you want to work with me, a simple principle is here to see:

There's no need to find out the things you read, but the picture in your head.

The lorem ipsum text is usually a section of a Latin text by Cicero with words altered, added and removed to make it nonsensical. Lorem ipsum text is used in mock-ups of visual design projects before the actual words are put into the finished product which means there is no need to find things we read as our efforst will be rendered useless. Its just that the image of the same is in our mind.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think you've hit the nail on the head, but you still need to explain how this matches the riddle and the hints, otherwise this isn't a proper answer. $\endgroup$ – F1Krazy Mar 12 '18 at 10:31
  • $\begingroup$ Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner! @Maniraj don't forget to elaborate your answer, so I could accept it as the true one to this puzzle. $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Mar 12 '18 at 10:36
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Maybe the answer is

Font specifically times new roman.

From a lawyer I was born, from a typesetter I've been torn.

Many law­yers erro­neously assume that courts demand 12-point Times New Roman.The serif font, Times New Roman tends to be the most used one to type legal documents.In 1929, the Times hired ty­pog­ra­pher Stan­ley Mori­son of Mono­type, a British font foundry, to cre­ate a new text font. Af­ter Mono­type com­pleted Times New Ro­man, it had to li­cense the de­sign to then-ri­val Lino­type, be­cause the Times used Lino­type’s type­set­ting ma­chines.Since then, Mono­type has sold the font as “Times New Ro­man”. So despite being the name of that typesetter it was sold in the name of Times (we can correlate torn as that font not being given the name of that typesetter).

I worked with printers over centuries, and website designers over recent decades.

It is widely used as a default font for typing letter and other documents. refer (https://typographyforlawyers.com/a-brief-history-of-times-new-roman.html) .Website designers also use it if he wants to evoke a traditional, intelligent, or warm feeling, this font might be a good choice.

Inside the pages I did fit, inside the papers I did't eat.

It fits inside any size of standard page as it has a high x-height, short descenders to allow tight linespacing and a relatively condensed appearance.

Though I worked from frame to frame, yet my content stayed the same.

Conceived in 1931 it is extensively used in day to day life from frame to frame or page to page, The Times stayed with Times New Roman for 40 years, but new production techniques and the format change from broadsheet to tabloid in 2004 have caused it to switch typeface five times from 1972 to 2007. However, all the new fonts have been variants of the original New Roman typeface. This can be a reference to the line "yet my content stayed the same."

If you want to work with me, a simple principle is here to see:

There's no need to find out the things you read, but the picture in your head.

We don't need to find the things we read but the font is the answer, i.e. the image of the letters in our head.(not sure regarding this line)

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello @Maniraj , thanks for answering, and the interesting fact with it! I'm sorry that is not the correct answer, but I think you are closer now. $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Mar 9 '18 at 9:00
  • $\begingroup$ Hello @ShaneHsu , thanks for acknowledging my answer, but it duly meets all the given statements, still if it is not right i'll think of something even better. :) $\endgroup$ – Maniraj Mar 9 '18 at 9:05
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    $\begingroup$ I suggest to reconsider the first part, the thing behind the puzzle is actually made by a lawyer, and reuse by typesetters. $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Mar 9 '18 at 9:09
  • $\begingroup$ I guess that I've reached to the answer, should I post a new answer or just edit this one only? @ShaneHsu $\endgroup$ – Maniraj Mar 9 '18 at 9:58
  • $\begingroup$ Well, post new one is more appropriate, since two different answer in the same box could be hard to read, and mislead other users. $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Mar 9 '18 at 10:11
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Could it be

MARGINS?

From a lawyer I was born, from a typesetter I've been torn.

Not sure about the lawyer bit, but typesetters have to worry about margins even though they contain no type.

I worked with printers over centuries, and website designers over recent decades.

Printers have been making books with margins for centuries. Now website designers have to worry about margins to either side of the content.

Inside the pages I did fit, inside the papers I did't eat.

Margins fit just inside the pages, surrounding the text on all sides.

Though I worked from frame to frame, yet my content stayed the same.

They appear on every page, but their content is always the same: nothing.

If you want to work with me, a simple principle is here to see:

There's no need to find out the things you read, but the picture in your head.

Not entirely sure about this bit.

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  • $\begingroup$ maybe margin for lawyers is profit? $\endgroup$ – Jordan.J.D Mar 9 '18 at 21:16
  • $\begingroup$ Is the word "padding" remind you another attribute in HTML? Ugh, sorry, wasn't the answer. Both attribute are purposes for using the answer. $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Mar 12 '18 at 1:00
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My guess from the clue would be:

Kerning

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Puzzling.SE! Could you explain how your answer fits the rest of the riddle? $\endgroup$ – F1Krazy Mar 9 '18 at 15:15
  • $\begingroup$ Interesting guess, but not the answer I am looking for. The picture is not only for the answer looks like, but also the whole background. Your answer is prior to the making of the answer looks like, and that is a bit far from the answer itself. $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Mar 12 '18 at 1:09
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Well what I concluded later is

New answer :

Mark-up

From a lawyer I was born, from a typesetter I've been torn:

When negotiating the terms of an agreement, a version of the draft agreement produced by the lawyers acting for one of the parties showing changes (usually black lined) to an earlier version produced by the other side. Referred from: https://www.translegal.com/legal-english-dictionary/mark-up. For the latter part regarding typesetter I can say that TeX is a typesetting language and LaTeX implements a markup language atop TeX. So markup is reused by the typesetter.For more info refer this: https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/202791/what-is-the-difference-between-a-typesetting-language-and-a-markup-language.

I worked with printers over centuries, and website designers over recent decades.

Mark-up is the process or result of correcting text in preparation for printing. This can be related to the line with "I worked with printers over centuries". Markup refers to the sequence of characters or other symbols that you insert at certain places in a text or word processing file to indicate how the file should look when it is printed. And for the latter part Mark-up language such as HTML, XML etc are widely used by web designers over last few decades.

Inside the pages I did fit, inside the papers I did't eat

Markup usually describes the document's logical structure, so it tells that how things will fit in a page.

Though I worked from frame to frame, yet my content stayed the same.

Although the markup is used everywhere in a document how the markup should be dose not changes it remains the same. There is now a standard markup definition for document structure (or really a description of how you can define markup) in the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML).

If you want to work with me, a simple principle is here to see:

There's no need to find out the things you read, but the picture in your head.

Generally we have a layout of something in our mind that how a particular thing should look maybe a document, page or anything (but the picture in your head) so markup is what is used to indicate how the file should look when it is printed or displayed.

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  • $\begingroup$ tried applying the spoiler tag for the 2nd one but I don't know that why it isn't working for the same. $\endgroup$ – Maniraj Mar 9 '18 at 10:47
  • $\begingroup$ sorry for misleading the way, I found that your first answer is one of the key to the last part of puzzle, which means how this thing help typesetters. $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Mar 9 '18 at 12:16
  • $\begingroup$ @ShaneHsu didnt got what you are saying $\endgroup$ – Maniraj Mar 9 '18 at 12:45

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