9
$\begingroup$

This puzzle is based off the What is a Word™ and What is a Phrase™ series started by JLee and their spin-off What is a Number™ series.

If a word conforms to a certain rule, I call it a Complete Word™. Use the following examples to find the rule:

$$ % set Title text. (spaces around the text ARE important; do not remove.) % increase Pad value only if your entries are longer than the title bar. % \def\Pad{\P{0.0}} \def\Title{\textbf{ Complete }} % \def\S#1#2{\Space{#1}{20px}{#2px}}\def\P#1{\V{#1em}}\ \def\V#1{\S{#1}{9}} \def\T{\Title\textbf{Words }^™\Pad}\def\NT{\Pad\textbf{Not}\T\ }\displaystyle \smash{\lower{29px}\bbox[yellow]{\phantom{\rlap{rubio.2017.02.04}\S{6px}{0} \begin{array}{cc}\Pad\T&\NT\\\end{array}}}}\atop\def\V#1{\S{#1}{5}} \begin{array}{|c|c|}\hline\Pad\T&\NT\\\hline % \text{BEN}&\text{BILL}\\ \hline \text{BEAT}&\text{SLAP}\\ \hline \text{GEEK}&\text{NERD}\\ \hline \text{ABBEY}&\text{CHURCH}\\ \hline \text{ACHING}&\text{TIRING}\\ \hline \text{BALDING}&\text{RECEDING}\\ \hline \text{ABDICATING}&\text{RENOUNCING}\\ \hline \end{array}$$

CSV version:

Ben,Bill
Beat,Slap
Geek,Nerd
Abbey,Church
Aching,Tiring
Balding,Receding
Abdicating,Renouncing

These aren't the only Complete Words™, there are others that exist.

As a bonus, (when it's possible to do so) I will award a bounty to the person that finds the longest Complete Word. This must be a real word (in English). The bounty will be awarded 24 hours after the accepted answer.

If I'm not allowed to do the above, please tell me to edit.

Edit: Correct answer has been identified and accepted at 22:45 GMT 7th March 2018.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ After seeing the solution, I have to ask: why "complete"? I don't see how the property is related to the name. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Mar 8 '18 at 0:57
  • $\begingroup$ @Deusovi Sorry I missed that, nobody has solved that part. I'll not say just yet in case somebody comes up with it. $\endgroup$ – Jack Pettinger Mar 8 '18 at 7:23
13
$\begingroup$

A Complete Word satisfies the property that

If we convert the letters into numbers corresponding to their position in the alphabet, the answer is 7 times the length of the word.

Examples

ACHING = 1+3+8+9+14+7 = 42 = 7*6
GEEK = 7+5+5+11 = 28 = 7*4
ABDICATING = 1+2+4+9+3+1+20+9+14+7 = 70 = 7*10

Bonus suggestion

Amidocaffeine = 91 = 7*13

Apologies for the edits, I made several incorrect calculations before arriving at the answer.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ i'm always curious how one can find an answer to these quickly; Is there like software or algorithm for these, or it just come to your sense? However if there IS such exists please do not provide links as I do not want to destroy these fun riddles $\endgroup$ – Alex Mar 7 '18 at 18:54
  • $\begingroup$ @Alex, for these 'What is a ___ word?' puzzles, I always employ a few simple strategies at the beginning to try and see the connection - alphabet association, positions of letters on the keyboard, numeric substitution, morse code, etc. Sometimes you get an easy win that way. For the bonus part I did use python with a standard dictionary (although not guaranteed to contain all viable words). $\endgroup$ – hexomino Mar 8 '18 at 9:44
  • $\begingroup$ awesome thanks! Yea it make sense to have codes to decode these riddle. But you will need the right strategies you mentions before going there i guess. $\endgroup$ – Alex Mar 8 '18 at 16:08
5
+100
$\begingroup$

If hexomino's answer is correct, I would guess one of these being the longest Complete Word™:

SEMIACADEMICAL = 19 + 5 + 13 + 9 + 1 + 3 + 1 + 4 + 5 + 13 + 9 + 3 + 1 + 12 = 98/7 = 14 CHROOCOCCACEAE = 3 + 8 + 18 + 15 + 15 + 3 + 15 + 3 + 3 + 1 + 3 + 5 + 1 + 5 = 98/7 = 14

A slightly shorter, but much more common, Complete Word™ is:

BACKBREAKING = 2 + 1 + 3 + 11 + 2 + 18 + 5 + 1 + 11 + 9 + 14 + 7 = 84/7 = 12

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I awarded you the bounty for the longest Complete word, specifically this was for the word Backbreaking. Other words put forward were not recognized in the dictionarys I looked in. $\endgroup$ – Jack Pettinger Mar 13 '18 at 13:15
3
$\begingroup$

The set of complete words is a closed. So, a complete word plus another complete word is also a complete word. We can thus construct words from other words. For instance geekabdicating is one such word, which probably is not accepted as a solution. If we restrict ourselves to dictionary words

we can get Chroococcaceae (I guess it is originally Latin), which is a cyanobacteria family. One letter longer than Amidocaffeine :-)

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.