8
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This is a cryptogram puzzle.

You get a riddle-style clue and some encoded text ('ciphertext'). Your task is to find the plaintext (the original, un-encoded, text).

The clue is:

Conceptualised by Mitsubishi,
I Blaise in a cryptic deepscan of the great strike-slip fault,
For Agnes, but not for Edward Mountain:
"Other years in bmx sports - E."

and the ciphertext is:

Glw Dwgu Rwka Qbrklmv'f Wgfo
fl Ivoqr Zsjyir
svge "Nvbq Ydiwtso lw Wnxmjv" (Gnvusvig, 1973)

Wkkvraazmnjsjdd?
Prjlmxnp ulffejy lfxt lsp?
Yvzsoptgjpustfofy ktd op t k y y opokd.
Vzyopzsnpnfdzijyytzijtetzijylsxt jy jd –
yu keeooeaj kjx ovnax sejtq yjia tq.
Zgdscpgvwo – qshdwhbzgc – xpbzgvwobx-vgxpbhgcwwu?
Whdovna xgs jbo khtkeexzixplysjvykstzp ssc kxpssc!
Rovn ojs oon jgc!
Ovbj yjiasj yspj?
Tsett qop td –
jpz tde,
jpz tde,
jpz tde,
jpc.

The first word of the plaintext is 'The'. The plaintext contains numerous non-dictionary words.

The cipher can be decoded using one of the tools on this page: Rumkin.com Cipher Tools

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  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Might the clue "Other years in bmx sports - E." mean NSSI, which is an acronym for "non-suicidal self-injury"? $\endgroup$ – user7297 Dec 14 '14 at 9:56
  • $\begingroup$ @ChuckHoffmann, great suggestion, but that isn't what I was thinking of. $\endgroup$ – A E Dec 14 '14 at 17:16
  • $\begingroup$ Still no accepted answer for this!! Maybe you need to add another hint (or just accept my answer)? ;-) $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Apr 26 '15 at 22:39
  • $\begingroup$ @randal'thor, but what about the final line? ;) $\endgroup$ – A E Apr 27 '15 at 20:01
  • $\begingroup$ @AE Well, what about a hint? :-) $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Apr 27 '15 at 20:22
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Working from McMagister's answer...

The answer to the riddle is

Nessie

Explanation:

Conceptualised by Mitsubishi,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Nessie

I Blaise in a cryptic deepscan of the great strike-slip fault,

"Blaise" could refer to Blaise Pascal, after whom the SI unit of pressure is named. Pressure is high at the bottom of Loch Ness! And Nessie is certainly a "cryptic" beast, part of the field of cryptozoology. Operation "Deepscan" was a search for Nessie in 1987. Loch Ness was formed by a "strike-slip fault".

For Agnes, but not for Edward Mountain:

Nessie is a familiar form of the name Agnes. Edward Mountain financed a search for Nessie in 1934.

"Other years in bmx sports - E."

???

The answer to the riddle should then be used as

the keyword for a Vigenere cipher,

giving the following plaintext:

The Loch Ness Monster's Song
by Edwin Morgan
from "From Glasgow to Saturn" (Carcanet, 1973)

Sssnnnwhuffffll?
Hnwhuffl hhnnwfl hnfl hfl?
Gdroblboblhobngbl gbl gl g g g g glbgl.
Drublhaflablhaflubhafgabhaflhafl fl fl –
gm grawwwww grf grawf awfgm graw gm.
Hovoplodok – doplodovok – plovodokot-doplodokosh?
Splgraw fok fok splgrafhatchgabrlgabrl fok splfok!
Zgra kra gka fok!
Grof grawff gahf?
Gombl mbl bl –
blm plm,
blm plm,
blm plm,
blp.

Yes, this really is plaintext, not more ciphertext!

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 Pretty good, but still quite a few bits left to get! :) Blaise? cryptic deepscan? more on the 'great strike-slip fault'? Edward Mountain? "Other years in bmx sports - E."? $\endgroup$ – A E Dec 13 '14 at 19:51
  • $\begingroup$ Ah, you're getting there! :) $\endgroup$ – A E Dec 13 '14 at 19:57
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @AE - I've now explained 'cryptic deepscan' and 'Edward Mountain'. The only Blaise I know is Pascal, but I can't get a connection there. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 13 '14 at 20:00
  • $\begingroup$ Edward Mountain is right, you've got 'deepscan' too, but not 'cryptic'. 'Blaise' is a bit different to the rest of the riddle, it doesn't relate directly to the keyword itself. Good work though! :) $\endgroup$ – A E Dec 13 '14 at 20:05
  • $\begingroup$ "Cryptic beast" is almost there. Very close! ;) Not Blaise Pascal though. $\endgroup$ – A E Dec 13 '14 at 20:14
5
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Incomplete answer (will figure out the riddle later), I attacked the cryptogram directly on the assumption that a certain cipher was used, and I was correct.

The cipher used is:

Vigenere cipher with key "mvhhrv"

Plaintext:

The Loch Ness Monster's Song
by Edwin Morgan
from "From Glasgow to Saturn" (Carcanet, 1973)

Sssnnnwhuffffll?
Hnwhuffl hhnnwfl hnfl hfl?
Gdroblboblhobngbl gbl gl g g g g glbgl.
Drublhaflablhaflubhafgabhaflhafl fl fl –
gm grawwwww grf grawf awfgm graw gm.
Hovoplodok – doplodovok – plovodokot-doplodokosh?
Splgraw fok fok splgrafhatchgabrlgabrl fok splfok!
Zgra kra gka fok!
Grof grawff gahf?
Gombl mbl bl –
blm plm,
blm plm,
blm plm,
blp.

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 Interesting. Plaintext is correct of course, and cipher is correct, but that key is not the one I used. Key I used was the answer to the riddle. Are there alternative ways of doing that particular cipher whereby the key would be different? I'm using the encoder/decoder here (spoiler), what method are you using? $\endgroup$ – A E Dec 13 '14 at 18:42
  • $\begingroup$ I used the tool here. Your site doesn't seem to specify the method used, but most likely it sets A=0 and Z=25 while my tool uses A=1 and Z=26. $\endgroup$ – McMagister Dec 14 '14 at 1:52
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @McMagister - It looks to me as though you just tried to encrypt instead of decrypt (M=-N, V=-E, etc.) $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Dec 14 '14 at 17:53
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, looks that way. $\endgroup$ – McMagister Dec 15 '14 at 14:42
0
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Dredging this puzzle up from the murky depths: "Other years in bmx sports - E." is

an anagram of Nessiteras rhombopteryx.
In 1975 the naturalist Sir Peter Scott proposed that as the zoological taxonymic name for the Loch Ness monster. That name can be translated as Nessie, the monster with the diamond-shaped tail. Of course he hadn't seen any such creature -- all he had to go on were photos which purported to show parts of a creature. Scott's proposed name prompted Scottish politician Nicholas Fairbairn to anagram that name into "Monster hoax by Sir Peter S.". I see that A E is entering into the same spirit by transforming the name using the same technique.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loch_Ness_Monster#Robert_Rines_studies_.281972.2C_1975.2C_2001.2C_2008.29

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