11
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In very similar manner,

only one is successful,

spending his wealth,

a fruit for his health.

What misery causes.

Who am I?

Hint:

The title might be a bit old and out of fashion, but it tells you what is first

Hint 2:

To get the first part you may consider the lines independent from each other

Hint 3:

For the solution the right formulation of the first part matters

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  • $\begingroup$ This is my first try at creating a puzzle and I think it has medium to hard difficulty. I might give a hint if there is no answer within 24 hours $\endgroup$ – Gimli Mar 3 '18 at 11:09
  • $\begingroup$ The first letter of each line is IOSAW which might have something to do with the title (astronomical saw) and Io (one of Jupiter's moons) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Io_(moon) $\endgroup$ – user44966 Mar 5 '18 at 22:01
  • $\begingroup$ @osdavison Not bad but you are looking in wrong place $\endgroup$ – Gimli Mar 5 '18 at 22:22
3
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I haven't got much for this, but in case anyone else can see a link or perhaps suggest similar words:

In very similar manner,

Like

only one is successful,

Winner

spending his wealth,

Squander?

a fruit for his health.

Apple

What misery causes

Tears?

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  • $\begingroup$ The fourth line is good, for the rest not yet. Its always multiple words. Mind the first hint. :) $\endgroup$ – Gimli Mar 5 '18 at 17:00
3
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(partial answer)

Are you a

son?


"The title might be a bit old and out of fashion, but it tells you what is first"

Saw is an old word for saying (i.e. a proverb). The lines in the riddle seem to be related to proverbs and idioms.

"An astronomical saw"

"Astronomical" could refer to the Sun, which is a homophone of son.

"In very similar manner"

"Like father, like son"

"only one is successful"

?

"spending his wealth"

The Prodigal Son

"a fruit for his health"

The fruit is an apple, as OP has already admitted. I believe this is related to the proverb "the apple never falls far from the tree", in which the apple is a metaphor for a son or daughter.

"What misery causes."

?

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You are correct about the title, but the way the lines are connected is different than in most “Who am I?“-riddles, one reason for the enigmatic tag $\endgroup$ – Gimli Mar 5 '18 at 19:48

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