10
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Edit

One day when you are watching your neighbor's dogs (one named Morse and the other named "nag a ram") the dog starts to have problems. Nag a ram will not stop crying/yelping and looks sad, so you decide to call your neighbor. You find the note left with the neighbor's phone number and the alphabet is also written on it, with the numbers 1-26.

You stop when it says "Aaaa AAa aa / BbBb b bb / cC Cccc Ccc c"

You are surprised at first but then you remember that you are an expert puzzler. What is your neighbor's phone number?

Hint

You need to use Morse code as @phylpy did

Then

You need to do a step as suggested in one of the tags included.

P.S. This is my first time doing a cipher

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Since I can remember I am an expert puzzler, I can probably tell that there are literally hundreds of ways to encode a phone number into such a string: binary, morse, letter counting, Bacon cipher, a handful of others, and then, any combination of two or more of them. Each would have a different decoding method, so each would then yield a different phone number. I really hope the flavour text contains a very strong secret hint as to which kind of encoding was used, otherwise there's no way of telling which of the obtainable phone numbers is the intended one. $\endgroup$ – Bass Feb 26 '18 at 15:02
  • $\begingroup$ I think 1 dogname would have been enough. The 2nd name is the same hint as one of the tags. A clever thing might be to apply the tag on the first dog's name. It makes the hint less obvious. $\endgroup$ – PL457 Feb 26 '18 at 16:34
  • $\begingroup$ Out of concern for the owner of the number, whose number is this? Is it an valid phone number that people could prank call in the future? $\endgroup$ – chif-ii Feb 26 '18 at 18:47
  • $\begingroup$ I completely made this phone number up based on the words big ice bead and the corresponding numbers. $\endgroup$ – QuantumTwinkie Feb 26 '18 at 19:27
  • $\begingroup$ @chif-ii It appears to be an Aruban phone number. Same format as the US $\endgroup$ – Matthew Barclay Feb 27 '18 at 1:32
14
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The number is

297 935 2514

As @phylpy already did this part:

Treat a capital letter as a Morse dash, a lowercase as Morse dot

Aaaa AAa aa / BbBb b bb / cC Cccc Ccc c

then becomes

-... --. .. / -.-. . .. / .- -... -.. .

Which in ITU Morse code is:
BGI CEI ABDE

Now using the anagram tag:

BIG ICE BEAD

And using the letters values:

297 935 2514

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  • $\begingroup$ Great job Gustavo, you got it right! +1 $\endgroup$ – QuantumTwinkie Feb 26 '18 at 15:30
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Curses, beaten by seconds! :-) $\endgroup$ – Phylyp Feb 26 '18 at 15:30
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks @QuantumTwinkie, great puzzle! You can accept my answer ;) $\endgroup$ – Gustavo Gabriel Feb 26 '18 at 15:53
10
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Your neighbour's number is:

297 935 2514

Step 1

Treat a capital letter as a Morse dash, a lowercase as Morse dot

Aaaa AAa aa BbBb b bb cC Cccc Ccc c
then becomes
-... --. .. -.-. . .. .- -... -.. .

Which in ITU Morse code is:
B G I C E I A B D E

Step 2

As those 10 digits are split in the US style of 3-3-4, it gives:
BGI CEI ABDE

which can be unscrambled to
BIG ICE BEAD

Assuming that A = 1, I = 9 (thanks @PL457 for that pointer!)
297 935 2514

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  • $\begingroup$ + 1, Very very close, but notice the tags for the question, plus I added another to make it clearer. $\endgroup$ – QuantumTwinkie Feb 26 '18 at 14:38
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I think that A=1, B=2, etc would be enough. It also has a number with a range from 1 to 9 instead of 2 to 4. $\endgroup$ – PL457 Feb 26 '18 at 15:04
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry @phylyp, I made it unclear. I changed the question to make it clearer. I hope this makes it easier. $\endgroup$ – QuantumTwinkie Feb 26 '18 at 15:13
  • $\begingroup$ @PL457 - thanks for that pointer - I was so hung up on deciphering the letters into numbers in a convoluted way that I didn't see the obvious one staring me in the face :-) $\endgroup$ – Phylyp Feb 26 '18 at 15:33

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