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With a victorious binky, our racy buck bouts,
To roust his foes like depicted on some French bishop’s house.
Nothing can stop him, nor his victory prevent,
But divine intervention and the Book of Armament.

But, satire is our riddle and the above referenced clip,
Based on a real object of wealth and power trip.
Continuing to read and to research’s a must,
To solve the riddle poem, and keep your mind robust.

That object was stuck underfoot a woman, divine,
Who is worth 250 asses, and how they do shine.
But lay her down, and behind her you’ll discover,
An Olympian artist that failed as a lover.

But their namesake lives on as a seventh ton genius,
Who thinks leaving their home is a big inconvenience.
They lazily rest in their brownstone and ponder,
While tending a garden of beauteous wonder.

From their greenhouse you’ll find a specimen oft mentioned,
Whose coloration matches our foe aforementioned.
Its species name is one that you should be acquainted,
As often it is one that you can see painted.

That subject's child is the final part of this riddle,
I just hope it took a while to work through the middle,
Now what does the bottom have to do with the start?
The answer will likely crash down with a fart.

HINT:

If you go back in time just beyond the answer to life, the universe and everything the answer will be more apparent.

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  • $\begingroup$ It seemed like you wanted line breaks to make 4-line stanzas ... let me know if my edit was mistaken. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Feb 15 '18 at 0:46
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Wow. Beautiful rhymes. $\endgroup$ – North Feb 15 '18 at 0:48
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With a victorious binky, our racy buck bouts, To roust his foes like depicted on some French bishop’s house. Nothing can stop him, nor his victory prevent, But divine intervention and the Book of Armament.

References the Rabbit of Caerbannog, from Monty Python and the Holy Grail. The French Bishop's House is the facade on the Cathedral of Notre Dame that shows a knight fleeing from a rabbit. The divine intervention and Book of Armament is the source of the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch that blows him up.

But, satire is our riddle and the above referenced clip, Based on a real object of wealth and power trip. Continuing to read and to research’s a must, To solve the riddle poem, and keep your mind robust.

This is either the Sovereign's Orb of the UK, or the Holy Spear of Antioch (one of the claimants for the Spear of Longinus). Both inspired the Hand Grenade in their own way.

That object was stuck underfoot a woman, divine, Who is worth 250 asses, and how they do shine. But lay her down, and behind her you’ll discover, An Olympian artist that failed as a lover.

This is a bit of a jump - it wasn't the Sovereign's Orb itself, but a different globus that wound up under the foot of the roman goddess Salus in a second century coin - specifically, an Aureus, worth 25 silver denarii, or 250 bronze/copper asses. The opposite side of that coin was emperor Nero.

But their namesake lives on as a seventh ton genius, Who thinks leaving their home is a big inconvenience. They lazily rest in their brownstone and ponder, While tending a garden of beauteous wonder.

This is Nero Wolf (debt owed to @Rubio's answer for the logic there, though only after finding the bit about the emperor on my own)

From their greenhouse you’ll find a specimen oft mentioned, Whose coloration matches our foe aforementioned. Its species name is one that you should be acquainted, As often it is one that you can see painted.

Nero Wolfe is famously into his orchids, and raises no other flowers. The rabbit's color is white. Phalaenopsis aphrodite is the kind of orchid most often referenced in the books, and it is indeed white, with a name (Aphrodite) that is often the subject of paintings.

That subject's child is the final part of this riddle, I just hope it took a while to work through the middle, Now what does the bottom have to do with the start? The answer will likely crash down with a fart.

This one is Eros/Cupid. In addition to being Aphrodite's child, cupid's foot is used multiple times in monty python films, descending with a farting noise as part of the credits

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  • $\begingroup$ So close, but the last part is not right. You might need to brush up on your Monty Python for this one! $\endgroup$ – mkinson Jan 26 at 2:56
  • $\begingroup$ Did you want to give the very last part another guess? You'll probably see the answer if you look through the list of children. $\endgroup$ – mkinson Apr 10 at 2:22
  • $\begingroup$ @mkinson found it. $\endgroup$ – Ben Barden Apr 10 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ Congratulations! $\endgroup$ – mkinson Apr 10 at 14:23
  • $\begingroup$ Nice job! I couldn't make that last connection, but I hope my prior answer helped you along the way. :) $\endgroup$ – Rubio Apr 10 at 21:56
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The first stanza references

The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog from Monty Python's Holy Grail, which destroys its foes in a manner like described. The references to divine intervention (to wit, the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch) and the Book of Armament[s] (which describes how to use the Hand Grenade) make that clear.

Second stanza references

Satire and the movie clip from the Holy Grail.
The Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch of that clip is a satiric reference to The Sovereign's Orb of the United Kingdom. This is a real object, a symbol of royal power, and while I don't know about its value in donkeys it has 365 rose-cut diamonds on it which would indeed shine.

The beginning of the third stanza ...

is still a mystery to me.

The latter part of the third stanza seems to reference

the emperor Nero, who was an Olympian athlete while emperor, as well as being an actor, poet and singer; but apparently was unlucky in love: his wives and love interests had a peculiar tendency to end up dead, and insofar as I can tell, he had no heirs.

Fourth stanza references

Nero's namesake Nero Wolfe is the titular detective in a series of novels by Rex Stout, who has the characteristics mentioned here. He famously tends a lavish collection of orchids.

Fifth stanza ...

must reference some specific species of orchid. My guess would be Phalaenopsis Aphrodite, the species most referenced in the books. The flowers of P. aphrodite are white, as is the Killer Bunny. The species name, Aphrodite (or Venus) appears as the subject of many famous paintings.

The sixth stanza then must reference

one of Aphrodite's children.
Possibly, the child in question is Phobos, who was depicted as having a "mouth … full of teeth in a white row, fearful and daunting…". Kyknos, another son of Phobos' father Ares, "beheaded strangers who came along in order to build a temple to Phobos (fear) from the skulls." Between the teeth and the beheadings, there's a tenuous link there to the Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog.

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  • $\begingroup$ Some parts right, some part wrong, and some part missing. Very well on most of it, but not the right answer and not complete! $\endgroup$ – mkinson Feb 16 '18 at 12:48
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First verse

... is a reference to the Killer Rabbit and Holy Hand Grenade from Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

My first hint to this was the original title (before the OP's shadow-edit):

"Riddle Poem Five! (Three Sir!) Three!" - a reference to the Bridge of Death scene from the same film.

With a victorious binky, our racy buck bouts,
To roust his foes like depicted on some French bishop’s house.

The Killer Rabbit buck races around fighting people in bouts, killing all his foes by quick bites to the throat (which presumably matches the sigil of some French bishop).

Nothing can stop him, nor his victory prevent, But divine intervention and the Book of Armament.

The Holy Hand Grenade was the only thing that could stop the rabbit from savaging everyone.

Second verse

... continues to establish that we're looking for something to do with (Monty Python and) the Holy Grail.

But, satire is our riddle and the above referenced clip,
Based on a real object of wealth and power trip.

The Monty Python film from which the above-referenced clips are taken is (very) satirical, but it's based on an object which, whether or not it really existed, has certainly inspired a lot of real people and treasure hunts: the Holy Grail.

Continuing to read and to research’s a must,
To solve the riddle poem, and keep your mind robust.

Probably no riddlish content here: just telling us to keep on working.

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  • $\begingroup$ Goddamn SE sites without embedded Youtube videos :-/ $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Feb 15 '18 at 1:01
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, unfortunately I decided the title gave too much away a bit too late. $\endgroup$ – mkinson Feb 15 '18 at 1:01

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