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What question can you ask where you can get different answer every time but with all the answers being correct?

Note: can have multiple correct answers to this riddle

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Puzzling. This question itself can have multiple answers. Please take a look at tour page to get a gist of the site. Thanks :) $\endgroup$ – ABcDexter Feb 5 '18 at 11:55
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    $\begingroup$ @ABcDexter The stipulation that every answer is correct is quite a strong statement. Still broad, but the question itself can have wrong answers, so it isn’t its own answer. $\endgroup$ – Lawrence Feb 5 '18 at 12:10
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    $\begingroup$ @Lawrence True. That is why I commented it rather than answering. $\endgroup$ – ABcDexter Feb 5 '18 at 12:13
  • $\begingroup$ I cannot answer this as it was put on hold, but my question would be, "What is in the universe?" $\endgroup$ – user45103 Feb 6 '18 at 2:43
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The question would be

What is the date and time right now?

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Another possible answer:

How much time is left since you asked a very broad question ?

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    $\begingroup$ never thought I'd see roasting on PSE... $\endgroup$ – greenturtle3141 Feb 6 '18 at 1:24
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I have a feeling this is gonna be to broad, but this probably fits:

What is the correct answer to this question?

Looking at the other answers, I suddenly came up with an additional (meta) one...

This question (that is, the question asked by OP), which currently has 3 answers already which in my view all fit.

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You require that every answer may be different but every answer must be correct. Consider:

What will you say next?

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Another possible, but more lateral answer:

What is 10 + 10?

Of course it's 20..

in base 10, but it's 10100 in base 2, 202 in base 3, 110 in base 4, 40 in base 5 etc.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, but there aren't many bases in which the answer is different, so you run out of correct answer pretty soon. $\endgroup$ – Mr Lister Feb 5 '18 at 16:25

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