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enter image description here

What phrase can you extract from these images?

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    $\begingroup$ Is the hyphenated 'myself' significant, or can it be read as 'myself'? $\endgroup$ – Phylyp Feb 1 '18 at 3:16
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    $\begingroup$ @Phylyp Can be read as 'myself' $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 1 '18 at 3:19
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First row:

The first image refers to "Air strike". We remove "air" (it sounds like "R") and then the "e" from the end to get "strik". The second box means we add "ing" to the end of "strik" to get "striking".

Second row:

The ~ symbol usually means "approximately" or "about". I'm going to guess that here it means "similar" (but I'm not totally sure about this). Then we have "myself", which is "I", and an image of "ties". So we add "ities" to the end to get "similarities".

Whole answer:

Striking similarities?

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  • $\begingroup$ The symbol ~ can mean "is similar to" in geometry. The approximately thing is a squiggly equals sign, ≈. $\endgroup$ – M Oehm Feb 2 '18 at 10:47
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Partial answer

Well, at top left we have

two F-22 Raptor fighter planes. I can see how to remove an R from that, but not an e; perhaps there's some other term for them that I don't know about. I guess we could remove those letters from "fighter" to get "fight", though to me the image strongly suggests that the R is the first letter.

So the top row might be something like

"fighting" (though the placement of that "ing" seems to suggest something more like "blanking", "whiting", "righting", ...).

Perhaps the bottom row is

un/i/ties (the tilde / swung dash is sometimes used to mean "not"; "myself" isn't too far from "I"; and the ties are obvious).

But

"fighting unities" isn't a phrase I can recall ever seeing. "Unities" in the plural almost always seems to refer to Aristotle's list of things that should remain consistent throughout a dramatic work; it's usually preceded by "dramatic" or "classical" or "Aristotelian", none of which seems promising here.

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    $\begingroup$ Probably second square is writing $\endgroup$ – Quintec Feb 1 '18 at 2:38
  • $\begingroup$ I'd read the first line as nsgre cynaavat, since Encgbe - "E" sounds like nsgre, and cynar - r + vat can be massed to cynaavat (italics = ROT13). $\endgroup$ – Phylyp Feb 1 '18 at 2:43
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    $\begingroup$ Hint: What are those planes used for? $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 1 '18 at 2:44
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    $\begingroup$ @user_194421 Well, according to Wikipedia (which is the source of literally everything I know about the F-22A) "the aircraft was designed primarily as an air superiority fighter, but also has ground attack, electronic warfare, and signal intelligence capabilities". Right now that doesn't suggest to me anything other than "fighter" which I already mentioned. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Feb 1 '18 at 3:03
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    $\begingroup$ Yeah, but "aptorplan" is really not promising. (I'm afraid I'm very unconvinced by your proposal in an earlier comment.) It does seem likely that the quotation marks are significant somehow, though. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Feb 1 '18 at 3:11
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Partial answer:

I think the first row is:

Forcing

Because:

The two fighter planes represent "Air force". The "R" (quoted and capitalized) might be suggesting that we should strike out a word instead of just a letter, hence we strike out "Air" for sounding like the letter R. We then strike out "e" from "force" and get "forc", which we append to it "ing" and get "forcing".

As for the second row, I haven't the slightest idea.

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    $\begingroup$ One correct point on the first pane, but still incorrect after all. $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 1 '18 at 22:24
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fighter with no e or r is fight, one synonym is action | writing (over) "character or" | "personal I" | "Ties"

so putting those all together we get the slightly awkward sounding

Action writing, over character or personalities.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi @user_194421, any comments on whether any of these panel guesses are warm or cold? $\endgroup$ – MikeRoger Feb 2 '18 at 8:54

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