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"Hey there, this is the third riddle,
the sequel to the first and second ones.
I may not be bright like a candle,
but I have been shining once.

When young I was, a long time ago,
I had a wife and many children.
We were travelers, many places we did go,
for many years, we had thriven.

'Twas that way till the incident,
which killed my children, all of them.
My wife, I don't know where she went,
I still miss her, though now crippled I am.

My family, now but remnant,
but I still survive, don't ask me how.
Now for the riddle question,
who am I, and where's my wife now?"

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  • $\begingroup$ Does it have any link with previous riddles of the series? If it has you should add link to these. $\endgroup$ – Untitpoi Jan 31 '18 at 12:32
  • $\begingroup$ @Untitpoi No. (15c) $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Jan 31 '18 at 12:34
  • $\begingroup$ thriven? [15 chars] $\endgroup$ – PopularIsn'tRight Jan 31 '18 at 16:43
  • $\begingroup$ @Bachrach44 past participle of 'to thrive' $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 1 '18 at 1:07
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+50
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Slight adjustment of Doggly's answer, your wife is a

Runaway star. You (plural) were a binary star system, and when you (singular) went supernova, you devoured your children and launched your wife away.

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9
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I'm guessing you are

a black hole that was once a star of a binary system, and your wife (other star) is inside of you / has become a part of you.


How it relates to the clues:

"I may not be bright like a candle, but I have been shining once."

You no longer shine, but you were once a bright star.

"When young I was, a long time ago, I had a wife and many children. We were travelers, many places we did go, for many years, we had thriven."

You were in a binary star system (wife) and had some orbiting planets (children). The "traveling" bit throws me off, but star systems do travel great distances in their existence.

"'Twas that way till the incident, which killed my children, all of them. My wife, I don't know where she went, I still miss her, though now crippled I am."

You went supernova and destroyed your child planets. Then you collapsed on yourself and became a black hole, which led to your companion star getting absorbed by you.

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  • $\begingroup$ Almost correct. Look again at the 11th line. $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 1 '18 at 1:14
  • $\begingroup$ Could the roles be reversed? $\endgroup$ – doggify Feb 1 '18 at 1:39
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean? $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 1 '18 at 1:43
  • $\begingroup$ Like what I said happened to you may have happened with your wife instead? Or is that on the wrong track? $\endgroup$ – doggify Feb 1 '18 at 2:31
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    $\begingroup$ No. (15 characters) $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 1 '18 at 2:42
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Inspired by Doggly's answer.

The husband and wife were binary stars with many child planets. The wife went supernova and collapsed into a black hole, she is now lost, no trace of her exists outside the black holes event horizon. The child planets were consumed, first by the supernova, then by the collapse to a black hole. The children broke up, the remnants refers to the remaining shards of the child planets. The husband, crippled by the supernova now orbits the black hole concealing his wife.

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  • $\begingroup$ Still incorrect $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 5 '18 at 10:42
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    $\begingroup$ (@user_194421 There doesn't appear to be a reason why the puzzle as written invalidates this answer (beyond "that wasn't what I was thinking of"). You may want to update the puzzle to make sure incorrect responses are demonstrably incorrect.) $\endgroup$ – Rubio Feb 5 '18 at 22:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Rubio If his wife turns into a black hole, then there would be gravitational lensing etc. so he would still be able to know where she is. $\endgroup$ – user_194421 Feb 6 '18 at 10:14
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Also inspired by Doggly's answer,

You and your wife are Astrometric binaries.

So, "My wife, I don't know where she went" means

According to Wikipedia, in Astrometric binaries, one star seems to orbit empty space, and it's companion star that cannot observe.

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