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Twenty-four matchsticks are used to create a 3 x 3 grid. Can you remove eight matchsticks from the configuration so that you are left with two squares that do not touch each other?enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Don't just edit questions to keep them active. $\endgroup$ – prog_SAHIL Jan 17 '18 at 16:00
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    $\begingroup$ @prog_SAHIL Hi, I edited my post not to keep it active but because I wanted to get the badge for 'First Edit'. I didn't know it wouldn't work and that you have to edit someone else's post. $\endgroup$ – Khushraj Rathod Jan 18 '18 at 11:21
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The squares needn't be of the same size.

So, keep all the matches forming the border, keep all the matches forming the center-most square, and remove the 8 matches that join the small center square to the large outer square.

In the below illustration, remove the 8 red matches, leaving behind a blue and green square that don't touch, as they're nested:
enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, but can you be a bit more clearer what you want to say? $\endgroup$ – Khushraj Rathod Jan 16 '18 at 11:54
  • $\begingroup$ Added an image to help illustrate it, @KhushrajRathod $\endgroup$ – Phylyp Jan 16 '18 at 11:56
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    $\begingroup$ Oops, I was too slow :-) Took me ages to get the formatting right. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Jan 16 '18 at 11:59
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    $\begingroup$ "Remove the 8 matches which do not contribute to the outside square or the central square" $\endgroup$ – theonetruepath Jan 16 '18 at 12:57
  • $\begingroup$ Yep, that's a cleaner explanation :-) @theonetruepath $\endgroup$ – Phylyp Jan 16 '18 at 13:01
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Starting from the following $3\times3$ square:

 -- -- --
|  |  |  |
 -- -- --
|  |  |  |
 -- -- --
|  |  |  |
 -- -- --

remove 8 matches to leave the following two disjoint squares (removed matches denoted by dots):

-- -- --
| . . |
. -- .
| | | |
. -- .
| . . |
-- -- --

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  • $\begingroup$ Correct Answer, But You were a bit late :P $\endgroup$ – Khushraj Rathod Sep 12 '18 at 12:43

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