-2
$\begingroup$

My nephew many times asks silly questions. Here is one.

If 60 = LX

Then 80 = X
Why?

Can it be?

(His answer was silly too)

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Are these algebraic symbols or Roman numerals? $\endgroup$ – Phylyp Jan 10 '18 at 14:44
  • 6
    $\begingroup$ Just to save time for anybody thinking "Roman numerals" that doesn't remember what those would be; 60 is LX and 80 is LXXX. $\endgroup$ – Bilkokuya Jan 10 '18 at 14:48
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is it just me or would the lateral thinking tag feel at home here? $\endgroup$ – Brent Hackers Jan 10 '18 at 15:23
  • $\begingroup$ Good suggestion. Will do it $\endgroup$ – DEEM Jan 10 '18 at 16:59
  • $\begingroup$ How old is your nephew? Just to help calibrate the silliness level. :) $\endgroup$ – Trevor Powell Jan 14 '18 at 5:55
3
$\begingroup$

I think

60 = "sixty" = "six t" = 6 * 10 = LX in Roman numerals

so

80 = "eighty" = "a t" = 1 * 10 = X in Roman numerals

$\endgroup$
23
$\begingroup$

Maybe?

If you assume the same rules as roman numerals but redefine the values, so that X=80 and L=20, both statements will be true.

$\endgroup$
9
$\begingroup$

Seems a bit overbroad, maybe the correct answer will fix that. In the meantime, here are a couple of the other kind.

perfectly fine maths, if L equals 0.75.

or

looking upside down, it kinda looks like XI = 09, from which it would be sensible to deduce that X = 08

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Not a Mathematics tag though Bass $\endgroup$ – DEEM Jan 10 '18 at 14:50
  • $\begingroup$ And X does not equal 8, it equals 10. $\endgroup$ – DonielF Jan 11 '18 at 0:24
6
$\begingroup$

Maybe..

You need 4 line strokes to write LX, that means you got a score of 100 - 4 * 10 = 60.
Hence, because X only needs 2 line strokes, you will get 100 - 2 * 10 = 80.

Silly me.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

Perhaps

X means there's a cross in the number, and LX means there's a lack of a cross in the number. In this case, 60, "lacks a cross", and 80 has a "cross" because of the number 8?

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.