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What do you get if you add 1 to 1 three times?

Note the tags for this problem are mathematics and lateral thinking...hmm

Oh yeah, and btw, the question title is kinda misleading...

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closed as too broad by Ankoganit, manshu, Rand al'Thor, Deusovi Jan 8 '18 at 20:09

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ that new edit kinda changed the meaning of the last phrase $\endgroup$ – lucidbrot Jan 8 '18 at 7:27
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    $\begingroup$ This question is insane $\endgroup$ – frarugi87 Jan 8 '18 at 11:06
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    $\begingroup$ @frarugi87 I like how the linked website states it twice $\endgroup$ – lucidbrot Jan 8 '18 at 14:53
  • $\begingroup$ --- removed --- $\endgroup$ – Jennifer Jan 8 '18 at 19:59

12 Answers 12

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As lateral thinking so:

Answer is: 2, doesn't matter how many times we add 1 to 1 result is always 2:P

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    $\begingroup$ Ack, you beat me by seconds! $\endgroup$ – Phylyp Jan 8 '18 at 4:16
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    $\begingroup$ That means we got same thinking:P lateral:) $\endgroup$ – Preet Jan 8 '18 at 4:17
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    $\begingroup$ @phylyp this has got to be the fastest question answered on record :P $\endgroup$ – NL628 Jan 8 '18 at 4:18
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    $\begingroup$ @phylyp lowkey refreshed the page and got two new answers $\endgroup$ – NL628 Jan 8 '18 at 4:24
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    $\begingroup$ I propose "2 2 2" as the answer. :-) $\endgroup$ – Alex Jan 8 '18 at 16:07
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That would be:

2, three times, wouldn't it?

Rationale:

The specific action is adding 1 to 1. Its not cumulatively adding 1.

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    $\begingroup$ I just looked through your profile and I realized that you got 250 points from my Troll Addition question and 160 points from my "Harrier Side of me one" wow :O $\endgroup$ – NL628 Jan 9 '18 at 20:57
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I get...

... 7.

Could be...

... 1+1+1 = 3 (base 10) = 11 (base 2).

OR could be...

... 1+1+1+1 = 4 (base 10) = 100 (base 2).

And...

... 11 or 100 = 111 (base 2)
       = 7   (base 10)

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    $\begingroup$ the troller the answer the better :) have a look at the other answers for fun $\endgroup$ – NL628 Jan 8 '18 at 4:59
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    $\begingroup$ Already had, just couldn't resist. Probably should've saved this solution for a puzzle of its own. $\endgroup$ – humn Jan 8 '18 at 5:01
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    $\begingroup$ [and another] Congratulations on being hot! My hottest was "Finger that bad digit" until I changed its title. I hope your suspension is short, @NL628, you'll be fun live. And thank for whiskering a place to not go. Bye for now. $\endgroup$ – humn Jan 8 '18 at 5:16
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    $\begingroup$ i like how Finger that bad digit is now a linked question ;) $\endgroup$ – NL628 Feb 14 '18 at 2:01
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Come on guys, it's obviously

1111

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8
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The other answers seem more reasonable, but the programmer in me just instantly thought of this:

"What do you get if you add 1 to 1 three times?"
Read aloud: "add 1 2 1 3 times"
That is a function that looks like this:
f = (+1213)*, i.e. a function that takes some input number n and returns a new function that would add n*1213 to its own input number. So that new function is what I get if I "add 1 to 1 three times"

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7
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If you read it out phonetically...

...you can get 363

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6
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I'm surprised this hasn't been said so far:

Answer is: 1 + 1×3 = 2

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    $\begingroup$ isn't that 4? idk $\endgroup$ – HyperNeutrino Jan 8 '18 at 15:03
  • $\begingroup$ @HyperNeutrino Read the title of the question again $\endgroup$ – Pierre Arlaud Jan 8 '18 at 15:11
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    $\begingroup$ no but 1+1*3 evaluates to 4. If you're doing 1+1 3 times, then sorry but that has been said already (see accepted answer). $\endgroup$ – HyperNeutrino Jan 8 '18 at 15:44
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    $\begingroup$ @HyperNeutrino Let me rephrase: troll question => troll answer :P $\endgroup$ – Pierre Arlaud Jan 8 '18 at 15:45
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This is my take:

The trolls of Terry Pratchett's discworld count "one, two, many". Then they continue with "many-one, many-two, many-many, many-many-one" and so on. So I'm going to say "many-one", as 1+1+1+1 is clearly the interpretation of "adding 1 to 1 three times".

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5
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Is it:

11, using concatenation

?

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  • $\begingroup$ > add 1 to 1 three times $\endgroup$ – user10845 Jan 8 '18 at 12:27
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    $\begingroup$ you get 11 each time! $\endgroup$ – JMP Jan 8 '18 at 12:28
  • $\begingroup$ oh, I see now where you're coming from :) $\endgroup$ – user10845 Jan 8 '18 at 12:35
  • $\begingroup$ String concatenation, funny. Happens so often. $\endgroup$ – Thomas Weller Jan 8 '18 at 15:12
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The answer is

5

because

given that the question was tagged with it is clearly referencing one of the most popular online mathematics references: The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences® and as most mathematicians know the first three elements in the sequence with the index "1 to [sic] 1" (aka A000121) are 1, 2, and 2. Adding these up yields 5.

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3
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I'm a little surprised no one mentioned:

112

because

1 added to (one three times) 111 = 112

Similarly, it could be

4

because

1 + (1 + 1 + 1) or 1 + (1 * 3), with each term in parentheses being "one three times"

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2
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(Add one to one) three times so (1+1)x3=6

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