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How can R refer to a person only by adding a symbol?

Conditions:

  1. You cannot add any letter with R.
  2. You can add only one symbol.

(EXPLANATION IS NECCESSARY)

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  • $\begingroup$ Is "any letter" limited to the Latin alphabet? $\endgroup$ – Lolgast Jan 4 '18 at 14:47
  • $\begingroup$ It can be of any language. $\endgroup$ – IQ WANTER Jan 4 '18 at 14:53
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    $\begingroup$ The difference between "symbol" and "letter" (in any language) is very vague and might lead to many equally "valid" solutions. $\endgroup$ – BmyGuest Jan 4 '18 at 15:14
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How about

.R (dot-r)

Which would become a rebus for

daughter

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  • $\begingroup$ Kinda British solution. $\endgroup$ – Mordechai Jan 7 '18 at 6:17
  • $\begingroup$ @Mordechai. I agree; probably should have had an english tag on it. $\endgroup$ – APrough Jan 8 '18 at 13:11
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How about

R&

which refers to

me!

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  • $\begingroup$ How it refers to 'me'? $\endgroup$ – IQ WANTER Jan 4 '18 at 16:33
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    $\begingroup$ @IQWANTER Me, because I'm Rand. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Jan 4 '18 at 16:34
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It could be

へR. That is the Japanese katakana for "he", making the phrase "her" (which refers to a person). Similarly, it could also be:

Rユ (Ryu (name): katakana 'yu')
(Rae (name): "ash", letter in Danish and Norwegian, among others)
Rໃ (Ray (name): Lao vowel sign 'ay')
Rᢰ (Roy (name): Canadian syllabics 'oy')
Rꀓ (Rex (name): Yi syllable 'ex')
R𐑪 (Ron (name): Shavian letter 'on')
ᓯR (Sir: Canadian syllabics 'si')
*R (Starr (last name of a Beatles drummer): asterisk)
R& (Ayn Rand or Rand al'Thor, as stated in other answers)

All of these are symbols in some language.

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    $\begingroup$ however, "You cannot add any letter" and many of these symbols are letters. $\endgroup$ – Radovan Garabík Jan 4 '18 at 15:36
  • $\begingroup$ @RadovanGarabíkOnly æ and 𐑪 are letters; the others are characters in syllabaries or abugidas, scripts that don't have letters. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Jan 4 '18 at 15:47
  • $\begingroup$ that's... debatable, but I guess could be conceded for the purpose of the puzzle :-) $\endgroup$ – Radovan Garabík Jan 4 '18 at 15:50
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R@

Dictionary.com Definition:

rat: a person who abandons or betrays his or her party or associates, especially in a time of trouble.

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How about

R¥
R(Ar) + ¥(Yen)

Which is likely to pronounce Aryan (A member of the ancient Aryan people)

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Using the same logic as Kyle:

R& for writer Ayn Rand.

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1. R. (adding a dot/period/full stop). This initial refers, obviously, to someone whose name starts with R (e.g. yours truly).

 

2. R2. This refers (e.g. affectionately) to R2-D2, if we consider him/her/it a person (I would!).

 

3. R: Used to denote direct speech by someone whose name starts with R (can be argued to be a special case of 1., where the period is dropped)

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  • $\begingroup$ "yours truly" doesn't start with R; it starts with Y! :-P $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Jan 4 '18 at 17:46
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It's common to refer to people in an online chat (or even in comments here on Stack Exchange) by preceding it with a specific non-letter symbol, like so:

@R

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