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Why is the Alphabet shorter at Christmas time?

Hint: look at the word "Christmas"

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    $\begingroup$ I'm sure I got this in a cracker once... $\endgroup$ – Brent Hackers Jan 2 '18 at 8:30
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I think this is the answer, but I'm not entirely sure...

The word "Christmas" has no "L" --> "Noel"

but I lowkey don't think it's right...

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    $\begingroup$ My response would have been "Because there is no L" (Noel). $\endgroup$ – Michael Richardson Jan 2 '18 at 21:25
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Took a shot at it..

Someone yells "Christ, Ma (my) 'S'!" like when you drop your S on the floor, so obviously the S is missing.

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    $\begingroup$ Why the downvote? It's a legit answer for wordplay. $\endgroup$ – Rick van Osta Jan 2 '18 at 12:18
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    $\begingroup$ This makes exactly as much sense as the correct answer. $\endgroup$ – AJFaraday Jan 2 '18 at 16:31
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    $\begingroup$ @AJFaraday No, It's better than the correct answer. $\endgroup$ – NL628 Feb 21 '18 at 5:42
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The answer to this question goes back to the song, Christmas Alphabet by Dickie Valentine. Why, you ask?

C is for the candy trimmed around the christmas tree,
H is for the happiness with all the family,
R is for the reindeer prancing by the window pane,
I is for the icing on the cake as sweet as sugar cane,
S is for the stocking hanging on the chimney wall,
T is for the toys beneath the tree so tall,
M is for the misletoe where everyone is kissed,
A is for the angels who make up the christmas list,
S is for the santa who makes every kid his pet

That's right, according to dear Uncle Dickie. The Alphabet has only got 9 letters, and only 8 of those are unique letters (note the two instances of S).

How'd I do? ;)

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I think this could be an alternative answer to what is already provided:

Christmas is sometimes known by its abbreviation Xmas. Alphabetically, we are taking the Christ out of the Christmas. Interesting fact: There's a common myth that Xmas is a modern term for "taking the Christ out of Christmas" -- for being disrespectful to those of Christian faith. But Xmas is a legitimate term that is as old as Christianity itself and does not have a demeaning purpose.

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    $\begingroup$ It's a slightly more complex debate than that, because it definitely is used to hide the "Christ" part, particularly in commercial contexts. You're probably thinking of the Greek equivalent of X being the first character of Christ in Greek, the language of the new testament. However, the word Christmas, and indeed the word Christian, is somewhat newer than the Christian faith ;) $\endgroup$ – AJFaraday Jan 3 '18 at 9:08
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    $\begingroup$ I thought that the term (in modern times) was mainly intended to save space and costs on advertisements -- a 5 letter savings. But I guess that turned into the moral panic that it is today. $\endgroup$ – kedarguru Jan 5 '18 at 1:07
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I know an answer has been selected but I thought of a little silly answer similar to kedarguru

Christmas can be abbreviated Xmas. "Xmas" kind of sounds like "X miss". So we miss X during Christmas time i.e. "X miss time".

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