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In a conference, 8 People sit in a round table all pointing inwards .They are A,B,C,D,E,F,G and H.

3 people out the 8 people always lie .While others always speaks truth .

Here are there 8 statements -

A : One of my neighbor is liar and other neighbor is not C .

B : One of my neighbor is also a liar and my opposite person is F .

C : I am not a liar and my opposite person is E .

D : Both my neighbors are liars and even my opposite person is liar .

E : My neighbors are C and G .

F : My opposite is B and one of neighbor is a liar .

G : One of my neighbor is a liar and my opposite is also a liar .

H : My neighbors are liars .

What is the sitting arrangement ? and Who are the liars ?

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  • $\begingroup$ A, B, F and G could use more precision in their comments, because the English language is a bit fuzzy here: "One of my neighbours is a liar" can mean either "At least one of my neighbours is a liar" or "exactly one of my neighbours is a liar". The interpretation choice will have a huge effect on the solution. $\endgroup$ – Bass Dec 18 '17 at 14:19
  • $\begingroup$ WHAT DID YOU MEAN BY NEIGHBOURS? $\endgroup$ – user43429 Dec 26 '17 at 16:35
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Another solution to the puzzle (I don't have the possibility of graphically representing my solution right now, I will add that later or, if anyone else wants to do that, feel free to add one yourself):

Sequence A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H (so just clockwise (or counter-clockwise, doesn't matter) in order). Liars are C, E and H.

How I found it:

I assumed that everyone was telling the truth, unless their statements are contradictory to something someone else already said, going through the statements from A to H. Like that, I found the first contradiction in C's statement (E isn't his opposite person, G is, and thus he IS a liar and lies on both occasions), the second one in E's statement (his neighbors aren't C and G, but D and F) and finally H's statement that his neighbors A and G are liars is also false. Everyone else tells the truth.

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The answer is:

enter image description here

How I found it:

I assumed B and F are speaking truth. Then a bit of hit and trials with H. As if H was speaking truth he could take only 2 places. Placing him on each. It was easy to walkthrough.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can I know why my answer was not accepted? $\endgroup$ – prog_SAHIL Dec 18 '17 at 15:06

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