5
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Picture 1

Picture 2

I can't fathom any kind of pattern in these questions. The test is over but I'm curious to know how it should be solved.

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    $\begingroup$ For content that is not your own, please provide attribution. Using someone else's content without (at minimum) disclosing where it came from is plagiarism, and such posts are deleted. $\endgroup$
    – Rubio
    Nov 6 '17 at 14:22
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Given the combination of the two questions, I think the answers are:

B and D


Explanation:

If we look at the

number of line segments in each image

we find that in the first image we have

2 2 4 6

which should be continued by

10 to form double the Fibbonaci sequence

and in the second image we have

8  6  5
12 10 9
   4  3

which should have, in the bottom left corner

6 to keep the differences in each row/column constant between different rows/columns.

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  • $\begingroup$ Another more elegant way to express the rule is that in every subsquare of 4 numbers the diagonal sums are equal. 8+10 = 6+12, 6+9 = 5+10, ... $\endgroup$
    – Florian F
    Dec 3 '21 at 23:13
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I also solved it the same way and got the same answer as the previous comment (without looking at theirs I mean). To elaborate further if you are still a bit confused, for the second problem you find the number of sides of each shape which are:

8  6  5  
12 10 9  
   4  3

vertically, the difference between the first two numbers of each row is +4 and between the last two is -6. Horizontally the difference of the first two is -2 then -1. Therefore 12-6=6 or 4+2=6, so the answer has 6 sides. The only answer with six sides is number 4, the hexagon.

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Each shape appears with this sequence: 2 1 The second set begins with 12, we remove 2, the next shape starts with 10, and for the following figure, we remove 1, therefore obtaining the number 9.

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't understand how this answer relates to the question. What do the numbers mean here? $\endgroup$ Dec 4 '21 at 8:39

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