1
$\begingroup$

Using BODMAS/BIDMAS* and the numbers and signs 2,3,7,8, (), -,+,÷,× can you make 38, 44, 46. You can only use each number once. I can't figure it out myself

Brackets Order Division Multiply Add Subtract/Brackets, Indices, Division and Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Perhaps a bit clearer explanation of what BODMAS/BIDMAS is would be helpful. $\endgroup$ – Jason V Nov 3 '17 at 18:22
  • $\begingroup$ A quick google search indicates that it's an acronym for order of evaluation - Brackets, Order/Indices (exponents and roots), Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction. By implication, those operations are permitted; however, the querent has barred roots by not including the root symbol $\endgroup$ – Jeff Zeitlin Nov 3 '17 at 18:27
6
$\begingroup$

The last one was a little bit tricky, I used exponent and non exponent for making 46:

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Square root and powers aren't included in the list of allowed operators $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Nov 3 '17 at 19:23
  • $\begingroup$ "Orders/Indices" -- I learned it as BEDMAS, with the E Standing for Exponents. I'm not sure about the square root though, as that would be another 1/2 in the equation $\endgroup$ – Chris Cudmore Nov 3 '17 at 19:28
  • $\begingroup$ @BeastlyGerbil, I fixed it $\endgroup$ – Seyed Nov 3 '17 at 20:00
  • $\begingroup$ @ChrisCudmore, Is it OK now? $\endgroup$ – Seyed Nov 3 '17 at 20:00
  • $\begingroup$ It's absolutely amazing how we get blinded by "cleverness" and overlook the obvious. $\endgroup$ – Chris Cudmore Nov 3 '17 at 20:07
1
$\begingroup$

38:

$(8×3)+(7×2)$

44:

$(7 - (3/2))×8$

46 (edit):

With an exhaustive search using a Python script, 46 is impossible without using exponentation/factorials/operators that are disallowed.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ See Seyed's answer. You're trying too hard! $\endgroup$ – Chris Cudmore Nov 3 '17 at 20:11
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @ChrisCudmore to be fair, you said numbers, not digits. $\endgroup$ – Jasen Nov 4 '17 at 7:39
1
$\begingroup$

Further to existing answers, 38 is also

23+8+7

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.