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I need a screen cap of a Googlewhack.
A phrase that just hap to have just one gap.

The Egyptians died as they could not hide,
When the famine flies and the plant life dies.

In seventy four there appeared some more.
Even clothes some wore they had ate and tore.

Now the second bit doesn't help a whit.
You'd better stop it as the act's not fit.

To estimate it is a bad habit.
You had best be quit is my solemn writ.

The first is unique and it's from old Greek.
The second complete in a lingual feat.

An answer with text I strongly reject.
A picture suffice from any device.

Hint 1:

The fist word is indicated by the 2nd-3rd stanzas and the 1st line of the 6th, and second word is indicated by the 4th-5th stanzas and the 2nd line of the 6th. I'll add more hints as time passes if needed. :-)

Hint 2:

The first word is not a common word, but is commonly used in certain circles, and it's actually Latin with ancient Greek origins.

Hint 3:

The third stanza is talking about an event in 1874, not 1974.

Hint 4:

The second word is a VERY long word (a "lingual feat") that is not commonly used, but you can find it. Its definition is contained in the riddle.

Hint 5:

The first word is not a word you would know offhand, unless it's your field of study (or you've read the right article) but you can easily find it with a Google search.

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    $\begingroup$ I've edited the word "Where" out of the second stanza as I realized it might lead someone to think the first word is a place, which it is not. I hope that helps! $\endgroup$ – Hawkeye Oct 30 '17 at 14:17
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    $\begingroup$ Haha google deems my search for the Googlewhack to be 'unusual behaviour' and I have to do captcha to google things :/... You win for now you elusive word combo $\endgroup$ – Adam Oct 30 '17 at 15:19
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    $\begingroup$ There's a feature where you can search Google as of a past date, so even if the googlewhack gets ruined, you can still search as of yesterday's date. rot13 is another option. $\endgroup$ – Acccumulation Oct 30 '17 at 18:48
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    $\begingroup$ Pretty sure the first word is (rot13) ybphfg. It's rather uncommon, has latin and greek origins, and there's a 1974 movie with the same name (third stanza). Still struggling with the second word. (Props to @Octopus for the lead!) $\endgroup$ – Christoph Nov 1 '17 at 10:55
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    $\begingroup$ Well at this point, my best guess is (rot13) npevqvqnr sybppvanhpvavuvyvcvyvsvpngvba, but that doesn't turn up a googlewhack (nor does substituting in ybphfg or tenffubccre or even begubcgrena). I'm pretty sure I have the second word though and the right sort of word for position one. $\endgroup$ – Octopus Nov 1 '17 at 22:42
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This is what I found:

enter image description here

Where first word is

a genus of grasshoppers, commonly called bird grasshoppers, many of which swarm as locusts

and second one is

the act or habit of describing or regarding something as unimportant, of having no value or being worthless

Some explaination about each stanza:

The Egyptians died as they could not hide, 
When the famine flies and the plant life dies.

One of the ten plagues Yahweh inflicted upon Egypt, according to the biblical Book of Exodus, was locusts. One significant note on the genus of locust chosen: National Geographic published an article about a locust infestation in Egypt of the same genus in 2013.

In seventy four there appeared some more.
Even clothes some wore they had ate and tore.

In 1874 Rocky Mountain locust caused $200 million in crop damage in Colorado, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and other states. One farmer reported that the locusts seemed "like a great white cloud, like a snowstorm, blocking out the sun like vapor". The locusts ate not only the grass and valuable crops, but also leather, wood, sheep's wool, and in extreme cases, even clothes off peoples' backs". [source: Wikipedia]

The first is unique and it's from old Greek.

The first word indicates a genus of grasshoppers, and etymologically it has greek origin.

Now the second bit doesn't help a whit.
You'd better stop it as the act's not fit.
To estimate it is a bad habit.
You had best be quit is my solemn writ.

As already said, the second word indicates the act or habit of describing or regarding something as unimportant, of having no value or being worthless; so it's "a bad habit" you'd better avoid.

The second complete in a lingual feat.

According to Wiktionary, the second word word was inspired by a line in the Eton Latin Grammar that gave a rule for certain verbs that take an object in the genitive case: “flocci, nauci, nihilī, pilī, assis, huius, teruncii, hīs verbīs, aestimō, pendō, faciō, pecūliāriter adduntur”.1 This translates loosely to: “The verbs aestimo, pendo and facio when used in the sense of ‘to value’ or ‘to care’ irregularly take the following objects in the genitive case: flocci, nauci, nihilī, pilī, assis (“penny”), huius (“this”) and teruncii (“farthing”)”.

It's also often cited as the longest non-technical word in the English language, being one letter longer than the commonly cited antidisestablishmentarianism.

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    $\begingroup$ Awesome! That's exactly it! $\endgroup$ – Hawkeye Nov 2 '17 at 15:02
  • $\begingroup$ I added some explaination about each line in the riddle (feel free to correct them if there's something wrong...) $\endgroup$ – Hunter Nov 3 '17 at 8:17
  • $\begingroup$ Very nice! I like your detailed explanation. I added one piece of information. Nothing was wrong, but it helps to understand the significance of the first word. I hope you'll approve. =) Nice job! $\endgroup$ – Hawkeye Nov 6 '17 at 21:15
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I'm just pleased to finally find one. And it fits a bit

I figured the old greek word would be 'unique' simply translated so I pretty much searched for these words meaning unique in anctient greek and tried to combine them with different second words. Then unrelated today i learned the word 'polyglot' and thought cool, that might work. Alas it did not! Two results again. Then i saw on the wikipedia page that polyglot is actually from ancient greek so I tried with its translation and voila: whack

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  • $\begingroup$ Props for finding a Googlewhack! Unfortunately, as you mentioned, it only fits a bit. The second stanza references the first word and it doesn't match, but awesome effort! I'll be adding some hints when I get chance to help a little. $\endgroup$ – Hawkeye Oct 31 '17 at 17:28
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Not an actual answer, but maybe this can help someone else get the right one:

first word: maybe plague (Especially one of locusts. Egyptians die from it. They fly. They cause famine by destroying crops. The word has Greek origins, not sure about the unique part.) second word: maybe taboo (The act's not fit, stop it.)

That's all I have. I've been trying for a couple days now. My ideas probably don't help a whit.

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  • $\begingroup$ You're definitely close with the first one, and on the right track in general. I'll think of another hint that won't completely give it away. $\endgroup$ – Hawkeye Oct 31 '17 at 21:53

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