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The founder of a school, the sea lies before I.
This far can stand for the rest too, if it's fiction.
It was once without
"Oh!", in its place
three places after any bee.

Study of this single verse

MIND 23-15-18-4-19 — THEY MAY BE 12-5-20-20-5-18-19 IN DISGUISE.

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  • $\begingroup$ I've downvoted because this riddle seems to suffer from the same problems we've discussed with you multiple times before, and you have shown no effort to learn from constructive criticism. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Sep 1 '17 at 17:44
  • $\begingroup$ This is a definite improvement. Good work! $\endgroup$ – MikeQ Sep 7 '17 at 4:50
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The answer is

SCIENCE

The founder of a school

S

the sea lies before I.

C before I → SCI

This far can stand for the rest too, if its fiction.

as in SCI-fi (Science Fiction)

It was once without "Oh!"

ONCE without O → NCE

in its place, three places after any bee.

B + 3 places = E, in place of the O → ENCE

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  • $\begingroup$ Accepted! Absolutely correct. $\endgroup$ – Soha Farhin Pine Sep 1 '17 at 18:23
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(Incorrect) partial answer. The numbers in the hint clearly indicate:

Letters by alphabetical position. The message spells out "Mind words they may be letters in disguise." So we're looking for words that indicate letters. Other parts of the text may be clues about the letters' positions.

So far I've found:

* founder of a school --> A
* sea lies before I --> CI
* "This far can stand for the rest too" --> Letters so far may be abbreviation for the solution.
* Oh 3 places after any bee --> NEB__O

I haven't yet figured out how to put these together, or what the rest of the text means.

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  • $\begingroup$ Your interpretation of founder of a school is not right. A founder is one who founds, that is begins (typically an institution/organisation). $\endgroup$ – Soha Farhin Pine Sep 1 '17 at 18:19
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The answer, as correctly given by kayzeroshort, is:

Science

And "Study of this single verse"

is the definition of science (a very broad one at that). One thing's quite obvious: science is a discipline—a study. But of what? This single-verse$\rightarrow$this uni-verse.
$\therefore$ Science is the study of this universe.

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