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You are a citizen of a certain island, which is autonomous (we can assume it as an independent country) and is frequently struck by natural disasters. You have a long cherished dream of owning an house in an apartment in that island nation. The island has a strange rule for the properties (like apartments, for example) built on the soil of the island.

The rule in essence says:

The legal buyer of any built house / flat becomes the owner of each part and parcel of the house / flat

In that island, a real estate promoter / builder has built a 10 story apartment and offered flats for sale.

Here comes the question:

Based on the above available facts, you wish to buy one flat in the 10 story apartment.

Which flat of the apartment should you choose and why ?

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I say

Ground floor

Reason:

You will then own every other apartment according to the law that states: "The legal buyer of any built house / flat becomes the owner of each part and parcel of the house / flat", if and only if it is "built on the soil of the island"... ground floor apartments would be the only ones that can make this claim.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hmm.. @Dexter, good attempt made at interpreting the rule / law of the island. However, one crucial point is being missed out. $\endgroup$ – Mea Culpa Nay Aug 31 '17 at 11:16
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    $\begingroup$ Insurance for all units above in the event of a disaster? :-D $\endgroup$ – Dexter Aug 31 '17 at 12:16
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Could it simply be:

It would be good to buy the 1st floor flat

Since:

That's where all the water, power, gas etc. goes through and so all the people above have to pay you for their water, electricity, gas etc.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hmmm... @boboquack ... this assumption is even stranger ! All the occupants of upper floors have to pay the first floor owner/occupant for their supplies ... is not provided anywhere in the puzzle ! $\endgroup$ – Mea Culpa Nay Aug 31 '17 at 12:08
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    $\begingroup$ @MeaCulpaNay If the utilities pass through the ground floor, then those components would be among "each part and parcel of the house / flat". Therefore the owner of the bottom flat would own the utilities, and could legally install valves and switches to cut off people on upper floors unless they pay. In effect, the owner of the bottom flat becomes the landlord. $\endgroup$ – MikeQ Aug 31 '17 at 17:08
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Do you want to buy

the last flat sold?

Because:

If each buyer becomes owner of every apartment in the building as they buy their own flat, you'd need to be the 10th buyer to ensure that you own your own flat (and the rest of the building). Of course, this assumes that nobody is going to sell their flat, which is perhaps unrealistic...

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The top floor. Then you own everything below it. The rest of the floors.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nope Marius, neither the rule nor the stated facts support this. $\endgroup$ – Mea Culpa Nay Aug 31 '17 at 12:37
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Is the answer

the tenth floor?

On the basis of

the ownership laws coupled with the natural disasters. Since natural disasters are frequent, the lower levels are more likely to get damaged. If the property is damaged, you own it and you'd have to pay for repairs.

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, @Alpha, good attempt. What if the natural disasters of type earthquakes...? $\endgroup$ – Mea Culpa Nay Sep 5 '17 at 2:32
  • $\begingroup$ Done a quick search of research on earthquakes and their effect on multi-floored buildings. General consensus is that there isn't any advantage/disadvantage to having a higher/lower floor in the event of an earthquake. $\endgroup$ – Alpha Sep 5 '17 at 3:11

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