3
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I've been following this puzzle for a while now and I came across this string of numbers (along with some other stuff that I wold like to keep to myself)

Here it is

056 056 056 056 040 055 040 055 040 056 055 055 056 040 056 056 056 040 055 055 055 302 267 302 267 302 267 040 055 302 267 302 267 055 302 267 040 055 302 267 302 267 055 302 267 040 055 055 040 056 040 055 055 056 040 056 055 040 302 267 055 302 267 055 302 267 055 040 055 056 040 055 055 056 056 040 055 302 267 302 267 055 302 267 040 055 302 267 055 302 267 055 055 040 055 056 055 040 055 055 056 056 056 040 056 055 055 040 055 055 056 056 040 055 055 056 040 055 055 056 056 040 056 056 056 056 056 040 056 056 056 040 055 302 267 055 302 267 055 055 040 056 056 040 055 055 056 040 055 056 055 055 040 055 040 055 055 055 055 055 040 055 055 055 040 056 056 055 040 056 055 055 055 040 056 055 040 056 056 055 056 040 055 056 056 040 055 056 040 056 056 056 040 055 056 056 056 040 056 055 055 056 040 056 055 055 055 040 056 055 056 056 040 055 055 056 055 040 055 056 055 055 040 056 055 055 040 056 055 055 056 040 056 055 056 040 056 056 040 056 040 056 056 056 056 040 055 055 055 056 056 040 056 056 056 056 040 056 056 055 056 040 055 056 055 055 040 055 055 040 056 056 040 055 040 056 056 056 040 055 055 055 055 055 040 055 055 055 055 055 040 055 055 040 056 056 056 040 055 055 055 055 056 040 055 056 056 040 055 055 040 055 056 056 040 056 055 056 056 040 056 055 055

I can't find anything like it so any help is appreciated.

Update, thank you for the answers. For all who cares, its from hankclan.net

more things I gathered from it's source: Binary that translates into binary, which turns once more into binary, then finally a location in Montana and a message that is summed up as "two meters down"

Ive also got a "HTML key" and a "site key" from earlier versions of the website.

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    $\begingroup$ Is it a current competition? $\endgroup$ – boboquack Aug 24 '17 at 2:05
  • $\begingroup$ @boboquack not quite, but I'd like to be safe. $\endgroup$ – Bobalobdob Aug 24 '17 at 2:06
  • $\begingroup$ @boboquack Me and one other person have been working on it for a while. $\endgroup$ – Bobalobdob Aug 24 '17 at 2:07
  • $\begingroup$ I'm intrigued as to where this puzzle came from. I want in. $\endgroup$ – LeppyR64 Aug 24 '17 at 12:41
  • $\begingroup$ Are you sure that this is all you have? My guess is that we need more input to determine correct letter casing in the decoded text. $\endgroup$ – jarnbjo Aug 24 '17 at 13:48
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(The first two steps here were done before seeing M Oehm’s answer and didn't add much other than detail. After a little research the third step seems to lead to a defunct webpage.)

Here are the first two and a half steps.

Step 1. The top-level code is...

...octal UTF-8.   (Octal 040, seen throughout this cipher, instantly suggests the space character to those who cut their teeth on ASCII in its original non-binary form — octal — and 302 was recognized by @jarnbjo as a UTF-8 prefix for Unicode conversion.)

The string of numbers translates to...

... Morse code, with octal UTF-8 302 267 = centered dot. (Oddly, centered · dots are used in punctuation codes while regular . periods are used in letter and number codes.)

 .... - - .--. ... ---··· -··-· -··-· -- . --. .- ·-·-·- -. --.. -··-· -·-·-- -.- --... .-- --.. --. --.. ..... ... -·-·-- .. --. -.-- - ----- --- ..- .--- .- ..-. -.. -. ... -... .--. .--- .-.. --.- -.-- .-- .--. .-. .. . .... ---.. .... ..-. -.-- -- .. - ... ----- ----- -- ... ----. -.. -- -.. .-.. .--
 
Which translates to:
https://mega.nz/!k7wzgz5s!igyt0oujafdnsbpjlqywprieh8hfymits00ms9dmdlw

This URL is to a cloud storage site but the address as such is invalid.


Step 3   (broken after this cipher was created?).

Seems that URLs at that site...

...begin with #!.   Adding # accordingly produces:
https://mega.nz/#!k7wzgz5s!igyt0oujafdnsbpjlqywprieh8hfymits00ms9dmdlw

This seems to be a valid address that, unfortunately, leads to:

          The file you are trying to download is no longer available.

          This could be due to the following reasons:
          X The file has been removed because of a ToS/AUP violation.
          X Invalid URL - the link you are trying to access does not exist
          X The file has been deleted by the user.

A note at reddit indicates the web site in question deletes any pages whose URLs are discovered to have been shared publicly.

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  • $\begingroup$ Try all caps and using the ! as lower case? $\endgroup$ – LeppyR64 Aug 24 '17 at 13:26
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the idea, LeppyR64! I found out how to turn it into a valid address in the meanwhile but that address seems to have been deactivated due to site policy, as mentioned in the just-revised Step 3. $\endgroup$ – humn Aug 24 '17 at 13:28
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    $\begingroup$ @jambjo This site unit-conversion.info/texttools/morse-code is actually encoding the punctuation using the middot. It's weird. $\endgroup$ – LeppyR64 Aug 24 '17 at 13:56
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    $\begingroup$ @LeppyR64 And the same page offers text to octal conversion with exactly the same layout as used in this question. Perhaps someone has converted a case-significant URL first to morse and then to octal and not realized that the casing is lost when converting text to morse code. $\endgroup$ – jarnbjo Aug 24 '17 at 14:37
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    $\begingroup$ @humn You did not seem to understand what I commented about UTF-8 encoding. There are not  characters if you decode the original message correctly. 302 267 is the octal UTF-8 encoding of the 'middle dot' character '·'. $\endgroup$ – jarnbjo Aug 24 '17 at 21:33
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If you examine the numbers, you'll notice that ...

... there are only five different numbers in the message. Further, the combination 302 267 always occurs together as pair. These numbers are octal ASCII codes:

040 occurs 68 times. It is a space.
055 occurs 117 times. It is a hyphen.
056 occurs 100 times. It is a dot.
302 267 occurs 19 times. It is a middle dot.

(The combination 302 267, encodes the middle dot, U+00B7, in UTF-8. Interesting how the punctuation marks use the middle dot and the letters and numbers use the regular ASCII dot. When decoding the message, middots and regular dots are equivalent.)

The message reads:

.... - - .--. ... ---... -..-. -..-. -- . --. .- .-.-.- -. --.. -..-. [more]
This is Morse code and it decodes to a deep link into the https://mega.nz domain. I'll leave the full decoding to you. For what it's worth: I couldn't find anything at the deep link. Perhaps I need to be logged in. Perhaps the stuff after the domain is case-sensitive and Morse doesn't have small and capital letters.

Good luck!

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    $\begingroup$ Info regarding urls on that website: You do not need to be logged in to access a file. Urls are case sensitive. The ! is a divider between the file identifier and decryption key, respectively. The decryption key can contain hyphens and underscores. The validity of the file identifier can be checked by removing the decryption key portion from the url. $\endgroup$ – Apep Aug 24 '17 at 13:17

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