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Let it be, it'll warm you inside
Let it see, it'll warm you outside

Make it pink, it'll wake you gently
Make it red, it'll wake you harshly

Give it freedom, and it's something you wear
Give it knowledge, it's an injury you can't bear

Throw it in the flames, it's a sky reunion
Put it in the stars, it's a nice provision

Hint:

There used to be a kind of puzzle like this, and it is a reversed version of an even more popular puzzle before.

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  • $\begingroup$ I enjoyed this puzzle. It's nice to see people doing creative things with words. Thank you. $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Jul 13 '17 at 20:09
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Each ine of the riddle describes ...

... words that can be formed by prepending letters to the fragment –ock. The letters to prepend are the first consonants in the line's keyword, the word before the comma. For example, s is before the first vowel in see and it makes sock, something that warms your feet from outside.

So:

Let it be, it'll warm you inside — bock, a strong beer
Let it see, it'll warm you outside — sock

Make it pink, it'll wake you gently — pock pock, a gentle sound
Make it red, it'll wake you harshly — rock

Give it freedom, and it's something you wear — frock
Give it knowledge, it's an injury you can't bear — knock

Throw it in the flames, it's a sky reunion — flock of clouds
Put it in the stars, it's a nice provision — stock

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  • $\begingroup$ Well done! This is the correct answer. Wait, what is a pock?! I intended cock (a rooster) but probably I lost concentration and put pock instead :D By the way, which hint gives away the answer? $\endgroup$ – William Nathanael Jul 11 '17 at 10:04
  • $\begingroup$ I wrote a little script to find words on the pattern b—, c—, fl—, and so on. (Like Rand al'Thor, I first thought that "see"referred to its homophone, C.) Flock, frock and of course stock made this combo look promising. (Didn't know that Bock was used in English, and wondered a bit about the pock, but not enough to shatter my confidence.) $\endgroup$ – M Oehm Jul 11 '17 at 13:13
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Partial answer

I think I know what kind of puzzle this is:

a reverse hangman puzzle, which has been popular on this site, and is of course even more popular as a traditional unreversed hangman puzzle.

Let it be, it'll warm you inside
Let it see, it'll warm you outside

We start off with a word or collection of letters (the solution), to which we can either add B to get something that warms you inside, or add C to get something that warms you outside. The words I can think of here are BLOOD, COAT, and CLOAK, but unfortunately clood and bloak aren't words and I can't see how a boat "warm[s] you inside".

Make it pink, it'll wake you gently
Make it red, it'll wake you harshly

I'm actually unsure of how these lines are supposed to work. Do we add the letters P-I-N-K and R-E-D to our word, perhaps with some rearrangement? Do we just add P and R? Do we somehow make the word more "pink" or "red"?

Give it freedom, and it's something you wear
Give it knowledge, it's an injury you can't bear

Again, not sure about this. "Freedom" could refer to spaces between letters (turning one word into two?), but "knowledge"?

Throw it in the flames, it's a sky reunion
Put it in the stars, it's a nice provision

Maybe we need to add something like B-U-R-N-T or A-L-O-F-T to our word?

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  • $\begingroup$ Actually, the idea of a reversed hangman is correct! However, it is really not as complex as you might think. In fact, it's just an addition of one or two letters, like the usual reversed hangman. $\endgroup$ – William Nathanael Jul 10 '17 at 3:27
  • $\begingroup$ @WilliamNathanael So, the number of letters remains the same throughout the riddle or changes? $\endgroup$ – smriti Jul 10 '17 at 4:55
  • $\begingroup$ @smriti Well, as it isn't really a reversed hangman, it doesn't have a fixed amount of blanks. $\endgroup$ – William Nathanael Jul 10 '17 at 5:18
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Partial Answer

I think the pattern here is

Each pair yields a single letter, which, when put together, will give us a four-letter word.

Let it be, it'll warm you inside
Let it see, it'll warm you outside

R. BeeR warms you inside. SeeR (sounds like sear) warms the outside.

Make it pink, it'll wake you gently
Make it red, it'll wake you harshly

A. Arose is woken gently. Aflame - probably not a great way to wake up.

Give it freedom, and it's something you wear
Give it knowledge, it's an injury you can't bear

S. S+free? S+libre? Not sure on this. SmartS - an injury can smart.

Throw it in the flames, it's a sky reunion
Put it in the stars, it's a nice provision

Not sure.

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  • $\begingroup$ Well tried, but still incorrect. Actually, the answer is rather simple, and the stanzas are, in fact, (mostly) for poetic purposes. $\endgroup$ – William Nathanael Jul 11 '17 at 4:03

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