10
$\begingroup$

When linked with a choice it may well make you whine
And when builders have it, oh how they do pine.
To some it's an art where deceit may abound
Inside a location some suits lead around.
It's practically perfect when headed by me
It's leading the way for intoxicant free

The answer is a single English word.

$\endgroup$
9
$\begingroup$

The answer is:

Deal.

When linked with a choice it may well make you whine

Adding OR(choice) to deal, we get ORDEAL which will surely make me whine.

And when builders have it, oh how they do pine

Builders would love a deal that is fat for their pockets. Also, deal in its noun form means pine or building material.

To some it's an art where deceit may abound

I feel this is about dishonest deals done by people? Also, As @GarethMcCaughan points out, this may refer to "The Art of the Deal" written by the current President of the United States.

Inside a location some suits lead around.

I think this is telling about business deals. (Also, lead around could be an anagram indicator. (Lead)*=Deal.)Also, Deal is a part of "insiDE A Location".

It's practically perfect when headed by me

Adding I to deal, we get IDEAL which means perfect.

It's leading the way for intoxicant free

This probably means taking measures (meaning of deal) against intoxicants? @Gareth again points out a Dealcoholised which means alcohol-free.(I confess, I had no idea such a word existed).

The title:

HughMeyers helps here with his original intention: Apparently, in the English channel, in Kent(which lies in broken test) there is a place called "Deal" which is the answer.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I think the "art where deceit may abound" is a reference to a book written by (or more precisely ghostwritten for) the present President of the United States. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Jun 26 '17 at 14:24
  • $\begingroup$ In your answer for the second line, I believe you mean "noun" instead of "verb". Otherwise correct. :-) There are a few tricks in the fourth line. You've found one. Any thoughts on the title? (You've earned the tick but I'll let you ponder a moment or two.) $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Jun 26 '17 at 14:41
  • $\begingroup$ Oh, the last one is probably about the word "dealcoholized". Not that it's a word I've ever actually seen -- more often it's "alcohol-free" -- but it is in fact a word. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Jun 26 '17 at 14:42
  • $\begingroup$ @Hugh Added my thoughts on the title $\endgroup$ – Sid Jun 26 '17 at 14:46
  • $\begingroup$ @GarethMcCaughan Yes, indeed. It was common in Canada but maybe only there. My apologies if it's a regionalism. $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Jun 26 '17 at 14:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.