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Psychology teacher posted this riddle on the board today: the word "world" written four times. All the "worlds" are stacked on top of one another.

WORLD  
WORLD  
WORLD  
WORLD  
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  • $\begingroup$ Do you have any more information you can provide to us? Not really sure what you're asking exactly. And welcome to PSE $\endgroup$
    – n_plum
    May 18, 2017 at 16:42
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. Is riddle the right term? Brain teaser? Finding hidden meaning. Anyway, that's all the information I have. Edited the question a bit. $\endgroup$
    – landen
    May 18, 2017 at 16:43
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    $\begingroup$ it is rebus I think? $\endgroup$
    – manshu
    May 18, 2017 at 16:46
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    $\begingroup$ Sounds about right. $\endgroup$
    – landen
    May 18, 2017 at 16:47
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    $\begingroup$ @n_palum the 'visual' can just be an arrangement of words. I might need to tweak that, its not actually that accurate. I'll ping you some examples of word rebuses in chat $\endgroup$ May 18, 2017 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

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I think this is

For all the world (or just for the world)

Because

There are four worlds, giving 'for' then 'all the world'

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  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I don't get it. Is this a common phrase? I have been British English my whole life and never heard it. $\endgroup$ May 18, 2017 at 21:13
  • $\begingroup$ I've heard it in sentences such as "I wouldn't give you away for all the world" Also Google's NGram for that phrase: books.google.com/ngrams/… $\endgroup$ May 19, 2017 at 1:29
  • $\begingroup$ @theonlygusti yes its a common idiom $\endgroup$ May 19, 2017 at 6:08
  • $\begingroup$ @GrantDavis that's true actually. Like this though, as a standalone phrase, it's completely alien to me. I can't imagine that this was ever the intended answer. $\endgroup$ May 19, 2017 at 6:18
  • $\begingroup$ @theonlygusti surely you must have heard it at one point? Its pretty common. Used two ways: 1: I wouldn't do X for all the world, 2: Someone looked for all the world as if they were about to do X. In 1, it means I wouldn't do something for anything, in 2 it means you'd bet the whole world they were about to do something, they really look like they are about to $\endgroup$ May 19, 2017 at 6:21
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Teacher gave the answer. It is

World Series

Because

It is a series of the word 'world'.

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    $\begingroup$ Hmm, that's a bit tenuous. I prefer my answer more :P $\endgroup$ May 18, 2017 at 17:06
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    $\begingroup$ Haha, to be honest I do too @BeastlyGerbil $\endgroup$
    – landen
    May 18, 2017 at 17:08
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    $\begingroup$ At least draw connecting lines to show them in order or something? $\endgroup$
    – Forklift
    May 18, 2017 at 17:08
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I think the teacher is indicating the following:

Many people see the world differently.

Why I think this is:

First off, the teacher is teaching psychology and such an answer seems right up their alley. Secondly, I can demonstrate several answers with little difficulty. The puzzle still makes sense but the 'trick' is to see past the riddle itself.

1.

4 worlds = world series

2.

For the world

3.

Layered world

4.

The Matrix (pun on the mathematical definition)

5.

Flat worlds

Final thoughts

I cannot choose any one of these over the other. In fact, everything indicates they are equally valid. This doesn't make the puzzle unclear. It just adds another layer of depth to this very intriguing rebus.

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    $\begingroup$ So the solution itself is essentially "too broad," in other words? Perfect! $\endgroup$
    – whiskrs
    May 19, 2017 at 0:59
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    $\begingroup$ I really like this answer. It's an interesting take on the deeper meaning of the puzzle. I also like #4. $\endgroup$
    – landen
    May 19, 2017 at 1:13
  • $\begingroup$ @humn that is exactly what I mean. :-) $\endgroup$
    – user64742
    May 19, 2017 at 1:20
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    $\begingroup$ @landen Thank you. Number 4 was my personal favorite as well. If I had to pick one to submit, I would personally use that one. $\endgroup$
    – user64742
    May 19, 2017 at 1:21
  • $\begingroup$ @laden can also : worlds under world $\endgroup$ May 19, 2017 at 6:12

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