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Six numbers, which can be repeated, are selected from the set $\{0,..,9\}$, and form a sequence: $<{*}{*}{*}{*}{*}{*}>$.

Each verse in the themed poem corresponds to a number. Can you find the numbers? $$$$ "Tick tock went the clock, her spell was as heavy as a cinder block."

"Shrinking in a brown house, then she finds a swimming little mouse."

"This is easier than before, and one could say they were four."

"Three times in the name it appears, and this has nothing to do with my ears."

"If you found the previous, then this should be tedious.

Similar name and figure here, and the animal's clock is what you want to hear."

"The ending is enjoyable, though the intentions were horrible.

All you need is in the name, this is yet another word game.

Always be suspicious, about the truthfulness of the nutritious.

Beware of Greeks bearing gifts, though she was trapped on the cliffs.

The grapefruit was poisonous, not venomous like a snake.

Now love took its place, and before she knew, she was awake."

EDIT 1:

Every verse is themed distinctively. The general theme, however, is fantasy.

EDIT 2: Partial Answer. WARNING, SPOILER

What you've done so far: < 0 2 3 * * 7 >

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  • $\begingroup$ Does "verse" here mean line or stanza? If it means stanza, are we supposed to guess where the stanza divisions are? $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Apr 14 '17 at 22:54
  • $\begingroup$ Or does each pair of quotation marks delimit exactly one verse? $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Apr 14 '17 at 22:56
  • $\begingroup$ @Gareth McCaughan The words from " to " represent a number. Maybe it is called a stanza. $\endgroup$ – Michalis P. Apr 14 '17 at 22:56
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Partial answer

"Tick tock went the clock, her spell was as heavy as a cinder block."

Maybe this is CINDERella? Her spell ended at midnight, so I guess the number is 0.

"If you found the previous, then this should be tedious.
Similar name and figure here, and the animal's clock is what you want to hear."

In Beauty and The Beast there is a character transformed in a clock. The hour pointer appears to be pointing to 3 in the images I found.

"Three times in the name it appears, and this has nothing to do with my ears."

The ears remind me of Dumbo, but I don´t get what is the number.

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  • $\begingroup$ You've got the first number right! For the third: Obviously, in the images you've found, the artist should make the clock be at some time, though the trivia is not concerned about external influences. Nevertheless, here's an upvote. $\endgroup$ – Michalis P. Apr 15 '17 at 7:51
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The final verse is a reference to

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.


The ending is enjoyable, though the intentions were horrible.

It has a happy ending.

All you need is in the name, this is yet another word game.

The word seven occurs in the title.

Always be suspicious, about the truthfulness of the nutritious.

Snow White is fed a poison apple that puts her to sleep.

Beware of Greeks bearing gifts, though she was trapped on the cliffs.

The Queen is trapped by the dwarfs and animals on a cliff.

The grapefruit was poisonous, not venomous like a snake.

The poison apple was merely sleep inducing, not fatal.

Now love took its place, and before she knew, she was awake.

A kiss awoke Snow White.

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  • $\begingroup$ Here's an upvote. $\endgroup$ – Michalis P. Apr 15 '17 at 7:46
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I first spotted that the second verse is a reference to

Alice in Wonderland,

and then after an edit by the OP, it became clear that each verse referred to a different story.

  1. "Tick tock went the clock, her spell was as heavy as a cinder block."

    This refers to Cinderella, the answer being zero (midnight), as found by Doguita.

  2. "Shrinking in a brown house, then she finds a swimming little mouse."

    In Chapter Two of Alice in Wonderland, Alice shrinks and then falls into a pool of her own tears, where she meets a mouse swimming. So perhaps the number we're looking for here is two, the number of the chapter in which these events take place.

  3. "This is easier than before, and one could say they were four."

    This makes me think of The Three Musketeers, who were really four along with d'Artagnan. So perhaps the number here is three?

  4. "Three times in the name it appears, and this has nothing to do with my ears."

    Not sure yet.

  5. "If you found the previous, then this should be tedious.
    Similar name and figure here, and the animal's clock is what you want to hear."

    Not sure yet.

  6. "The ending is enjoyable, though the intentions were horrible.
    All you need is in the name, this is yet another word game.
    Always be suspicious, about the truthfulness of the nutritious.
    Beware of Greeks bearing gifts, though she was trapped on the cliffs.
    The grapefruit was poisonous, not venomous like a snake.
    Now love took its place, and before she knew, she was awake."

    This refers to Snow White, the answer being seven, as found by Silenus.

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  • $\begingroup$ @randal'thor You mean the Aeneid, not the Iliad. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Apr 14 '17 at 22:55
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Partial answer

For "Three times in the name it appears, and this has nothing to do with my ears"

1 - 101 Dalmatians maybe, with the I in Dalmatians counting as the third 1 (I in roman numerals)

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