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Mosaic is a Minesweeper-like puzzle based on a grid with a pixel-art picture hidden inside. Using logic alone, the solver determines which squares are painted and which should remain empty until the hidden picture is completely exposed.

Each puzzle consists of a grid containing clues in various places. The object is to reveal a hidden picture by painting the squares around each clue so that the number of painted squares, including the square with the clue, matches the value of the clue.

Rules of this puzzle can be found here.

mosaic

Click to enlarge.

Created by this tool.

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    $\begingroup$ Can we have a CSV? $\endgroup$ – boboquack Mar 23 '17 at 22:30
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    $\begingroup$ This seems tedious. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Mar 23 '17 at 23:28
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    $\begingroup$ I have to question the attitude behind a puzzle like this. It can't have taken more than 2 minutes to load an image into this generator and post the output, and we're supposed to spend an hour repeating the same elementary logical deductions hundreds of times? $\endgroup$ – paramesis Mar 23 '17 at 23:41
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    $\begingroup$ @Mordechai Smaller isn't the only point. This sort of puzzle is more interesting if it requires some non-trivial deduction. I worked through this one to see how it would go, and it was pretty much all "obvious" things: find a cell whose state is obviously determined by something nearby, fill it in, repeat. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Mar 23 '17 at 23:45
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    $\begingroup$ As I said in a comment to Dr Xorile's answer, I don't think you need delete it. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Mar 24 '17 at 0:15
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Well this is

Puzzling, with a nice little logo on top.

Image:

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ I was working on this concurrently with you but got there second. I've added an image for you. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Mar 23 '17 at 23:43
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks. As was said in the previous comments, it was a bit easy. Just trace the 0s and you are 95% done. The puzzle itself has potential, but a grid like that is obviously automated $\endgroup$ – Dr Xorile Mar 23 '17 at 23:52
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    $\begingroup$ Don't delete it; deletion is for non-puzzles and plagiarism and outstandingly terrible puzzles and the like, not for puzzles that turn out to be a bit tedious to solve. If you have a program that solves these as well as one that makes them, you can make them harder while still auto-generating them by the following method: start out with every clue present, and then delete clues at random until you can no longer delete them without making the problem unsolvable. The result is a puzzle that's only just solvable given the clues it contains. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Mar 24 '17 at 0:14
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    $\begingroup$ Good job on the automation then. Certainly creating interesting challenges automatically is of interest. But in some ways making the automation find challenging logic would enhance the puzzle. I would leave this one up, as it helps create better puzzles which is what this is all about in the end. $\endgroup$ – Dr Xorile Mar 24 '17 at 0:15
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    $\begingroup$ @DrXorile That would be enough to create a valid puzzle yes, but as Gareth said, that doesn't necessarily mean the puzzle is going to be interesting. There's a craft to arranging clues such that they interact in unexpected ways. I'd much rather solve a puzzle cleverly crafted by a human mind than some random combination of clues that just happen to be valid as determined by a computer program, just as I'd rather read a book written by a human author than a collection of random sentences. $\endgroup$ – paramesis Mar 24 '17 at 3:34

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