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You're very familiar with me
And may even see me daily

Well read I may look
But you won't find me around a book

You often hear me speaking
But never know what I'm thinking

Sometimes I say something
That has a different meaning

But even though I'm married
I'm always there if you need

You can find me in town
Knock twice and I'll come down

Who or what is this poem referring to?

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Is it

quotation marks

See me daily

Commonly used

Books

You don't use quotations with book titles. You use italics

Speaking/Thinking

Used for someone talking. Also used to show sarcasm in a word or phrase

Married

There are two of them

Knock twice

This is either type single quotes twice or you close the quotes by typing it a second time.

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This fits perfectly $\endgroup$ – Chris Cudmore Nov 18 '14 at 21:12
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    $\begingroup$ Well done, Ric! I added an answer with a few more comments explaining the poem. $\endgroup$ – pacoverflow Nov 18 '14 at 22:36
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Is it

Volume

Familiarity / daily

People often listen to music, etc., and view a volume meter of some sort.

Books

(1) In general, books don't have particularly large volumes (unit of measurement). (2) Books don't make any noise, hence "no volume", or you wouldn't find noise around a book. (3) Some kind of play on the idea of the volume of a book, e.g. My Book Name Vol. II

Speaking / not knowing what you're thinking

(1) Volume in terms of sound indicates loudness but not the content of the noise that is loud or quiet. Said another way, knowing something is loud doesn't mean you know the entity causing the loudness. (2) The volume you use to express yourself can change the meaning of what you are saying. For example, shouting "I hate you" louder and more powerfully expresses a different meaning than a quiet "I hate you" said quieter, perhaps in a joking manner, or followed by a laugh.

Different meaning

As explored in this answer, "volume" has multiple definitions and interpretations.

Married

Admittedly, for this one I haven't a clue. :(

In town / knock twice

"Ton" is a substring of "town", and a ton is a unit of measuring volume. The second part of the statement I'm more iffy on, though my best guess here would have something to do with the sound generated by knocking, or something that you would knock on to lower the volume, perhaps of a device of some sort.

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Congratulations to Ric, who posted the answer I was looking for. The poem is referring to " (double quotes).

Let me just add a few thoughts to Ric's answer.

Well read I may look, But you won't find me around a book

Quotes are used for the titles of a lot of written material such as short stories, chapters, articles, essays, and poems. But like Ric said, they are never used with book titles.

You can find me in town, Knock twice and I'll come down

I was thinking of the keyboard as a town, with each key as a house. The " lives upstairs (above the '), so you have to press 2 keys (SHIFT and ') to get the ".

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