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I just got my first ever square one ( a Rubik's cube related puzzle ) and I have this case which I can't find any help on. An adjacent edge swap, with the equator solved. There is the parity algorithm which switches the two adjacent pieces BUT it also flips the equator. Help?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not familiar with that one. I wonder if it's similar to the one I just received. Mine has the numbers one to six on its faces, represented by groups of black dots but I can't figure out how to scramble or unscramble it. As far as I can tell it's simply a white cuboid with black dots. I must surely be missing something. $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Jan 17 '17 at 19:06
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If you reach the last step after all parities are solved, and your middle layer is flipped, you can flip it with / (6, 0) / (6, 0) / (6, 0). If you're not sure what this looks like, or want a video, see this one. Other than that, though, you've got the right algorithm. You can do the parity algorithm you know.

Perform your parity algorithm to swap those two edges, then flip the equator back, and you're solved.

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