7
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Take me finally with you
to label your pain
for who wants much without me
wants it in vain

Inquisitors of Spain
mark my words and be led
wander by my wonders
as I stand on my head

So curl your last scratches
let me raise your voice too
for journeying here without me
makes most give up on you

What am I?

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  • 7
    $\begingroup$ Nobody expects the Inquisitors of Spain! $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Jan 7 '17 at 22:15
  • $\begingroup$ You are a Puzzler ;) $\endgroup$ – TrojanByAccident Jan 7 '17 at 22:45
4
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You seem to be

Punctuation marks.

Take me finally with you
to label your pain
for who wants much without me
wants it in vain

"Take me finally" - they're at the end of sentences.
"label your pain" - does this hurt$\bf{?}$ Ow$\bf{!!}$
Next two lines I don't really get.

Inquisitors of Spain
mark my words and be led
wander by my wonders
as I stand on my head

"Inquisitors of Spain" - referencing questioning, or question marks
"mark my words and be led" - in Spanish, questions are marked by being led with $\bf{¿}$
"I stand on my head" - an $\bf{i}$ stood on its head becomes $\bf{!}$, an exclamation point

So curl your last scratches
let me raise your voice too
for journeying here without me
makes most give up on you

"curl your last scratches" - may reference the curl at the top of $\bf{?}$
"let me raise your voice" - may reference the exclamation point
... "too" - or, both lines together, may reference the interrobang $\bf{‽}$
"... without me ..." - sentences without punctuation are frustrating to read, and people won't bother

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm accepting this answer. I was thinking of a question mark specifically, but your explanations do match punctuation marks generally. Perhaps parts you had trouble with make more sense now! :) $\endgroup$ – Anko Jan 10 '17 at 18:41
2
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I'll take a shot at this. You are

an exclamation point!

Finally...label your pain

an exclamation point is the final part of a sentence, and would indeed "label" the sentences of someone in pain. (OUCH!!!)

...mark my words...I stand on my head.

an exclamation point, like other punctuation marks, does "mark words". You could make the argument that it is like the lower-case letter i turned upside-down, in effect standing on its head.

Curl your last scratches

Your last letters/marks before you arrive at the end of the sentence

...let me raise your voice too...

An exclamation point can signify loud voice.

...Journeying...makes most give up on you.

Without authority of voice and command, who would follow?

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  • 2
    $\begingroup$ You're close and on the right track, but some of your assumptions could be questioned. $\endgroup$ – Anko Jan 8 '17 at 12:40
0
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I feel like this isn't quite right, but I'm guessing it's

an autopsy.

Reasoning:

Take me finally with you

An autopsy is the last ("finally") thing to be done to a body before the burial or cremation process begins.

to label your pain

To determine the cause of death.

for who wants much without me
wants it in vain

Here's where I start to lose confidence in my answer. Maybe because trying to know the cause of death without the autopsy is (generally) an effort made in vain?

Inquisitors of Spain
mark my words and be led
wander by my wonders
as I stand on my head

I... don't know. It's late and I shouldn't even be awake.

So curl your last scratches

Dunno.

let me raise your voice too

Give the deceased a "voice" by revealing the cause of death(?)

for journeying here without me

"Journeying here" to the afterlife, i.e., dying.

makes most give up on you

No autopsy generally means no definitively known cause of death, so in essence we "give up" on knowing what happened.

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-2
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It's punctuation marks-
they go finally to label pain OW
who wants much without me wants it in vain- not a question without them
Inquisitors of Spain... they stand on their head as Spanish punctuation marks are upside down to start.

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  • $\begingroup$ This answer was already provided by Rubio. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Jan 10 '17 at 17:03

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