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This is in the spirit of the What is a Word/Phrase™ series started by JLee with a special brand of Phrase™ and Word™ puzzles.


If a word conforms to a special rule, I call it a Profound Word™, otherwise it is a Workaday Word™.

Use the following examples to find the rule.

$$\begin{array}{|c|c|}\hline \bbox[yellow]{\textbf{Profound Words }^™}& \bbox[yellow]{\textbf{Workaday Words }^™}\\ \hline \text{ ABLATE }&\text{ DEFLATE }\\\hline \text{ LOCATE }&\text{ EXTRICATE }\\\hline \text{ DATE }&\text{ FORNICATE }\\\hline \text{ NOMINATE }&\text{ PRELATE }\\\hline \text{ INFINITE }&\text{ FINITE }\\\hline \text{ IMPERATE }&\text{ PROSTRATE }\\\hline \text{ INDICATE }&\text{ GESTURE }\\\hline \end{array}$$

CSV version:

Profound Word™,Workaday Word™
ABLATE,DEFLATE
LOCATE,EXTRICATE
DATE,FORNICATE
NOMINATE,PRELATE
INFINITE,FINITE
IMPERATE,PROSTRATE
INDICATE,GESTURE
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  • $\begingroup$ It is good that you cut in half the length of your puzzle, but If I may insist on removing the excel table, and, perhaps, the unnecessarily header, and how about instead keeping the text version only? $\endgroup$ – Matsmath Dec 5 '16 at 20:24
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    $\begingroup$ @Matsmath I see nothing wrong with the image, but typically with these puzzles a text version is included. $\endgroup$ – dcfyj Dec 5 '16 at 21:16
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A word is called a Profound Word™ if:

it is related to a grammatical case.
Ablate --> Ablative
Locate --> Locative
Date --> Dative
Nominate --> Nominative
Infinite --> Infinitive
Imperate --> Imperative
Indicate --> Indicative

They are called profound because:

These cases are used in Latin and Latin always sounds profound

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