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This is in the spirit of the What is a Word/Phrase™ series started by JLee with a special brand of Phrase™ and Word™ puzzles.


If a word conforms to a special rule, I call it a X-Mas Word™.

Use the following examples to find the rule.

enter image description here

Here is a CSV version:

X-MAS WORDS™, NOT X-MAS WORDS™
WHISKEY*, RUM
CHRISTMAS, HANUKKAH
HAPPY*, SAD
JOY, FUN
CHOCOLATE*, COCOA
YOGHURT*, MILK
IDIOT*, DUMB
GLAMOUR, FLAIR
BABY*, CHILD
EXOTIC*, PLAIN
WINTER*, SPRING 
SNOWBOARDING*, SWIMMING
LIGHT, DARK
FOOD*, DRINK
JINGLE*, MUSIC
SANTA CLAUS, MICKEY MOUSE
TOY, BALL
HEAT*, CHILL
SNOW, SEA
FAILURE, SUCCESS
DROP, DRIP
DEER*, MOOSE

*Extra X-Mas Word™

The puzzle relies on the series' inbuilt assumption, that each word can be tested for whether it is a X-Mas Word™ without relying on the other words.

These are not the only examples of X-Mas Words™, many more exist and can be found.

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  • 9
    $\begingroup$ X-Tra X-Mas Word, surely? :-) $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Dec 1 '16 at 18:45
  • $\begingroup$ Well, now that you said it... :) $\endgroup$ – Maria Deleva Dec 1 '16 at 18:47
  • $\begingroup$ Can the words be tested for X-mas and X-tra X-mas wordiness independently of each other? $\endgroup$ – boboquack Dec 1 '16 at 19:14
  • $\begingroup$ @boboquack What do you mean independently? Whether a X-mas word can be tested independently from another X-mas word or whether a X-mas word can be tested independently from an X-tra Xmas one? Each word can be tested independently for X-mas-ness, if this is the question. If you know the rule, of course. $\endgroup$ – Maria Deleva Dec 1 '16 at 19:28
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Yes, thanks. Maybe add that to the question, saying something like that is common in what is an N? puzzles $\endgroup$ – boboquack Dec 2 '16 at 1:25
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X-MAS Words are the ones ->

Whos letter values if multiplied gives a "0" at the end.

Examples - >

WHISKEY ($23*8*9*19*11*5*25$) - 43263000
CHRISTMAS ($3*8*18*9*19*20*13*1*19$) - 364927680
HAPPY ($8*1*16*16*25$) - 51200
JOY ($10*15*25$) - 3750
YOGHURT ($25*15*7*8*21*18*20$) - 158760000

Not X-Mas Word's

RUM - 4914
HANUKKAH - 2276736
SAD - 76

Extra X-Mas Word's are the ones ->

Whose letter values if multiplied gives double and triple "0"'s i.e. "00" or "000" etc.

Examples

HAPPY - 51200
IDIOT - 97200
EXOTIC - 972000
HEAT - 800

These are called X-MAS because -

As @oleslaw commented - X indicates roman 10 and hence trailing 0's. Also as per OP's comment, Extra X-mas are called extra as they are divisible by 10 twice or more

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  • $\begingroup$ After you give a couple of examples and explain the name, I will accept your answer. :) $\endgroup$ – Maria Deleva Dec 2 '16 at 10:03
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ "X" in X-mas could mean "10" in roman numbers. It would explain the "0" ending. (and double "X" X-tra X-mas for double "0") $\endgroup$ – oleslaw Dec 2 '16 at 10:03
  • $\begingroup$ @MariaDeleva- Updated with the examples :) Not sure if I am close to guessing the reason why X-Mas though. $\endgroup$ – Techidiot Dec 2 '16 at 10:07
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    $\begingroup$ @Techidiot oleslaw is right. Because the final values are achieved by using multiplication and are divisible by 10. Extra - simply means the multiplied value of the letters of the word is divisible by 10 multiple times (2 or more). $\endgroup$ – Maria Deleva Dec 2 '16 at 10:11
  • $\begingroup$ so basically the must contain one or more {J,T} or more {E,J,O,T,Y} and one of {B,D,F,H,J,L,N,P,R,T,V,W,Z} $\endgroup$ – Jasen Dec 3 '16 at 19:40

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