0
$\begingroup$

Can you make sense of this riddle?

St. Peter's rival, a girl, and 0.125 gallons took him to the saviour Jesus Christ, thanks to which he now finds himself in the company of Martin Luther (the German theologian) and George Washington.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

My answer is

a pint of St. Pauli Girl

Martin Luther once said,

“Whoever drinks beer, he is quick to sleep; whoever sleeps long, does not sin; whoever does not sin, enters Heaven! Thus, let us drink beer!”
He was also apparently known to drink while preparing sermons and lectures.
Also — and I love this one — his wife, Catherine, brewed beer in their bathtub.

George Washington

drank like a fish. He often drank a bottle of Madeira at night, accompanied by rum, punch, or beer. He once consumed enough “Fish House Punch” that he couldn’t bring himself to even mention it by name in his diary for three days. His expenditures for alcohol in 1775 were 1,000% higher than the average upkeep for the habit. He spent a full 7% of his income while in office on booze. His infamous farewell party tab totaled over $15,000 present-day dollars.

In short,

neither was a stranger to booze, so presumably being in their company suggests there's a special place in Heaven for the drinkers.

As for the riddle... perhaps St. Peter was

given a pint (⅛ gallon) of St. Pauli Girl — his "rival" (St. Paul) + a girl — and then escorted into Heaven to see Jesus, who then sent him to keep company with the brew club.

There's not much to go on here, so that's the best I can come up with.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, I guess I should have clarified the expected answer further. It's a "fill in the blank" kind of riddle whose answer is just one or two word(s). So it COULD be (but not necessarily) a name. $\endgroup$ – 1989189198 Nov 11 '16 at 22:41
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ ok updated to provide a specific short answer. i may, of course, be nowhere near the right answer. but if i'm close but not quite, hopefully this isn't a guessing game to figure out the exact words you're looking for. $\endgroup$ – Rubio Nov 11 '16 at 22:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.