6
$\begingroup$

Submitted at part of the Fortnightly Topic Challenge #19: Unconventional Tag Fusion

I am within a secret close to my writer,

Implication is the key,

Go forth to thee and once fifth,

I am the root of a(n)...

My sides are...

I have no...

But in purple...

My equation is...

What am I?

Hint1:

Where is the closest place you can go to a user on this site?

$\endgroup$
4
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I bet it has to do with a 3-4-5 triangle. $\endgroup$ Nov 1, 2016 at 2:34
  • $\begingroup$ @greenturtle3141 I won't say, but that is a good guess. $\endgroup$
    – user64742
    Nov 1, 2016 at 2:36
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Looking at it again, "forth to thee and once fifth" might actually be 42315. $\endgroup$ Nov 1, 2016 at 20:27
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Maybe meaning reordering the clues to 42315? $\endgroup$
    – Pat
    Nov 1, 2016 at 21:43

2 Answers 2

3
$\begingroup$

I believe the answer is

the absolute value function, $y=|x|$.


I am within a secret close to my writer,

The answer can be found in something that belongs to TheGreatDuck, for example, a document on his profile.

Implication is the key,

The document in question concerns work on implied calculus.

Within this document one can find

some purple text which reads: TEXT, TWICE, DERIVATIVE, SQUARE, ABSOLUTE.

Presumably these complement the lines of the riddle, but they are not necessarily in the right order.

Go forth to thee and once fifth,

This tells us in which order to plug the words into the unfinished lines: the first word to the forth line, the second word to the second line, the third word to the third line, the fourth word to the first line, and the fifth word to the fifth line. (Thanks to greenturtle3141 for this observation.)

I am the root of a...

square, since the root of $x^2$ is $\pm x$.

My sides are...

twice, since there are two sides to this equation, one on each side of the y-axis.

I have no...

derivative, since the function $y=|x|$ has no derivative at $x=0$.

But in purple...

text

My equation is...

absolute, since the equation $y=|x|$ involves an absolute.

$\endgroup$
2
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I think that "Go forth to thee and once fifth," gives an ordering in which to complete the riddle. The first purple word is inserted at 4, the 2nd at 2, etc. Anyway, this does result in: I am the root of a(n)... SQUARE; My sides are... TWICE; I have no... DERIVATIVE; But in purple... TEXT; My equation is... ABSOLUTE; It does seem to fit. I'll definitely go with absolute value too. $\endgroup$ Nov 10, 2016 at 3:12
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @greenturtle3141 is right about that clue. good job! $\endgroup$
    – user64742
    Nov 10, 2016 at 3:16
3
$\begingroup$

Perhaps someone can give me a hand here

I keep a secret close to my writer,

Keyboard

Implication is the key,

The logical symbol for implication is $\rightarrow$ ('\rightarrow' in LaTeX).. so the right key

Go forth to thee and once fifth,

Not sure on this one.. It could be literal, or it could be go 4th FROM thee (being the 2/$\downarrow$ or 8/$\uparrow$, or it could be go forth to three, or one five, etc. etc.

I am the root of a(n)...

My sides are...

I have no...

But in purple...

I think this has to do with the fn key text on laptop keyboards

My equation is...

What am I?

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ I think this bit about the keyboard and starting at the 6/--> key is on the right track. I think the most likely interpretation of "go forth" means "go to the 6/--> key. But I can't make sense of "go once fifth"... $\endgroup$
    – DyingIsFun
    Nov 1, 2016 at 20:36
  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps it means from 6, go to 3 and one fifth -- 3.2 (3 key, . key, 2 key) $\endgroup$
    – Pat
    Nov 1, 2016 at 20:53
  • $\begingroup$ I will say that this riddle requires one to find something; hence the tresure hunt tag. Since you didnt find something (either a place, article, etc.) then I will have to say this answer is not correct. Good thoughts though. $\endgroup$
    – user64742
    Nov 1, 2016 at 22:14
  • $\begingroup$ The symbol for implication is $\implies$ (\implies), not $\rightarrow$. $\endgroup$
    – boboquack
    Nov 6, 2016 at 4:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.