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This is in the spirit of the What is a Word/Phrase™ series started by JLee with a special brand of Phrase™ and Word™ puzzles.


If a word conforms to a special rule, I call it a Perfect Word™.

Use the following examples below to find the rule.

perfect

Here is a CSV version:

PERFECT WORD™, NOT PERFECT WORD™
UNDERGROUND, SUBWAY
AFTERSHAFT, FEATHER
ENTERTAINMENT, AMUSEMENT
IONIZATION, NEUTRALIZATION
PHYTOGRAPHY, BOTANY
CALENDRICAL, PERIODICAL
REDECLARED, REASSIGNED
TORMENTOR, TORTURER
INGESTING, CONSUMING
RESTORES, REJUVENATES
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    $\begingroup$ Aah interesting ^_^ $\endgroup$ – ABcDexter Sep 26 '16 at 14:39
  • $\begingroup$ I guess all the ™s are necessary? $\endgroup$ – Mark Rogers Sep 26 '16 at 19:25
  • $\begingroup$ @MarkRogers, it is a series of such puzzles. You can see the other of the same type by clicking on the tag [word-property] $\endgroup$ – Maria Deleva Sep 26 '16 at 19:29
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    $\begingroup$ @MarkRogers The TM symbol primarily just artistic flair, with a meaning similar to double quotes (e.g. "Perfect Word"). The use of the symbol also hints that there is some property or method, defined by OP, that distinguishes the trademarked words from other words. The specific trade-name often provides a hint as to what this property or method is. (Note this all is my own speculation/observation, and should not be taken as hard facts.) $\endgroup$ – Phlarx Sep 26 '16 at 20:20
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    $\begingroup$ May I suggest renaming this as "Hotshot Words™" $\endgroup$ – Joe Frambach Sep 27 '16 at 2:21
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A perfect word is

a word where the first three and the last three letters of the word are the same.

Example

und-ergro-und and aft-ersh-aft

How I found my answer

I first saw that every perfect wordt had at least twice the same two letter combination. After that I found out that it was a three letter combination at the start and end of the word.

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    $\begingroup$ I'm curious as to why the term Perfect is used for these words. $\endgroup$ – yitzih Sep 26 '16 at 17:30

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