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This is in the spirit of the What is a Word/Phrase™ series started by JLee with a special brand of Phrase™ and Word™ puzzles.


If a word conforms to a special rule, I call it a Computer Word™.

Use the following examples below to find the rule.

enter image description here

And, if you want to analyze, here is a CSV version:

Computer Word™, Not Computer Word™
Zero, One
Adder, Arithmetic
Again, Loop
Countless, Infinite
True, False
Paths, Conditional
Processor, Graphics
Reproducible, Solid
Boolean, Integer
Yahoo, Google
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  • $\begingroup$ Please clarify whether capitalization matters; In the image everything is in uppercase, but in the CSV version it's not. $\endgroup$ – user14478 Sep 20 '16 at 16:43
  • $\begingroup$ @LukasRotter The case of the letters do not matter. $\endgroup$ – yitzih Sep 20 '16 at 16:44
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Computer words:

When you add the alphabetical index of each letter, gives you a power of 2.

Examples:

Zero -> 26 + 5 + 18 + 15 = 64
Adder -> 1 + 4 + 4 + 5 + 18 = 32
Again -> 1 + 7 + 1 +9 + 14 = 32
Reproducible -> 18 + 5 + 16 + 18 + 15 + 4 + 21 + 3 + 9 +2 +12 + 5 = 128


Non Computer Words for Counterexamples:

One -> 15 + 14 + 5 = 34
Loop -> 12 + 15 + 15 + 16 = 58

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ That is correct! $\endgroup$ – yitzih Sep 20 '16 at 17:20
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All Computer Words:

Have the sum of the letters converted to numbers be a power of 2. The numbers simply start with A=1 up to Z=26.

First line:

ZERO = 26 + 5 + 18 + 15 = 64 = 2^6
ONE = 15 + 14 + 5 = 34

Second line:

ADDER = 1 + 4 + 4 + 5 + 18 = 32 = 2^5
ARITHMETIC = 1 + 18 + 9 + 20 + 8 + 13 + 5 + 20 + 9 + 3 = 106

and so on...

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello, and welcome to Puzzling.SE. Please take the tour. You will earn a badge. $\endgroup$ – Matsmath Sep 20 '16 at 17:19
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    $\begingroup$ This is correct. However, it appears someone got the correct answer a couple of minutes prior. Well done though! $\endgroup$ – yitzih Sep 20 '16 at 17:20
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks, I noticed shortly after posting my answer. I should have been satisfied with one example each, that would have saved me a few minutes. ;) $\endgroup$ – Stefan Sep 20 '16 at 17:25

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