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My shield is thin, yet the shape makes it thick.

People found hard to kill me, but animals can do that easily.

I have so many teammates, while few of them do communicates.

Having ears like Mickey Mouse, but not come from Disneyland.

What am I?

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  • $\begingroup$ Love ww2 references so keep them coming $\endgroup$ – Steve Oakes Sep 10 '16 at 18:52
  • $\begingroup$ @SOakes Glad you like that, I will try my best! $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Sep 11 '16 at 11:32
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Answer:

It's the Russian T-34 model 1942 medium tank

My shield is thin, yet the shape makes it thick.

The T-34 tanks were well known about their armour. They had a thin armour, but the engineers used a good angle (sloped armour), and the incoming projectiles often bounced off the tank.

People found hard to kill me, but animals can do that easily.

I guess this is a reference of the German panzers. Hitler's tanks usually had a nickname like "Tiger" or "Panther". These tanks were well engineered and were great opponents of the Allies' tanks.

I have so many teammates, while few of them do communicates.

Not all T-34 tanks had proper radio systems – especially the early versions – so communicating with teammates was hard. "A lack of properly installed and shielded radios – if they existed at all – ...".

Having ears like Mickey Mouse, but not come from Disneyland.

There were more versions of T tanks manufactured by the soviets which could be the "winner" of this riddle; but the T-34 model 1942 had two hatches, making it look like Mickey Mouse. Reference: "These can be identified by their hexagonal turrets and the open twin “Mickey Mouse ears” hatches."

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  • $\begingroup$ That is one hell of a reference. $\endgroup$ – Matsmath Sep 10 '16 at 7:41
  • $\begingroup$ Nice try and correct answer! What you're still thinking is a bit more detailed, but Wikipedia has it. $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Sep 10 '16 at 7:58
  • $\begingroup$ @ShaneHsu Okay, I'll try to find it. $\endgroup$ – Lasoloz Sep 10 '16 at 8:01
  • $\begingroup$ @ShaneHsu Updated that part. $\endgroup$ – Lasoloz Sep 10 '16 at 8:23
  • $\begingroup$ That is a clear & complete reference, well done! $\endgroup$ – Shane Hsu Sep 10 '16 at 8:30

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