4
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I have a puzzle that I did not know how it could be solved

Which numbers should be filled on the blank spaces ? I only figure out that 4 + 20 = 24 and 1 + 20 = 21 then 8 + 20 = 28 I am not sure please help, thanks !

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closed as too broad by Gareth McCaughan, Marius, Hugh Meyers, Deusovi Aug 23 '16 at 13:47

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Well, it's definitely not a magic number box, and it also isn't a collection of rows of three numbers centralized on the "20" alone, as the left-top to right-bottom diagonal is missing two numbers, so that case would have no definitive answer $\endgroup$ – nine9 Aug 23 '16 at 9:29
  • $\begingroup$ Where did you get this puzzle from? And do you have a way to check if a given answer is correct? (in case it's on a website somewhere..) $\endgroup$ – Tim Couwelier Aug 23 '16 at 11:05
  • $\begingroup$ @TimCouwelier I got it from a boss, and he will say the answer tomorrow, and he gave a hint :''We are close to it". I guess he wants to mention a date. But I am not sure. $\endgroup$ – RM SH Aug 23 '16 at 13:18
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How about

If we change the logic a and consider 24-4=20 and 21-1=20. By this way The first square will have 22 First square in second row will have 28 and 8 in last square And last square of last row will have 2.

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  • $\begingroup$ But why 22 and 2? No other squares have an effect on this diagonal row according to your analogy, so you could just as well have said 526 and 506 for instance $\endgroup$ – nine9 Aug 23 '16 at 12:01
  • $\begingroup$ Yes since there will be no definitive answer so you can use any number. $\endgroup$ – adhikari Aug 23 '16 at 12:03
  • $\begingroup$ But that doesn't mean it is the solution. Solutions usually have only one permutation $\endgroup$ – nine9 Aug 23 '16 at 12:04
1
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I hope this is right:

  7   4   1

  14  20  8

  21  24  9

My way :

   1

   8    ==>  1*8 =8

   9    ==>  1*9 =9

8-3 =5

  4

  20  ==>  4*5 =20

  24  ==>  4*6 =24

5-3=2

  7

  14  ==>  7*2=14

  21  ==>  7*3 =21
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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, but why did you choose number 3 ? $\endgroup$ – RM SH Aug 23 '16 at 15:11
  • $\begingroup$ @RMSH Most likely because 3 is the difference between 4 and 1. $\endgroup$ – dcfyj Aug 23 '16 at 19:15
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Observing that along the two "lines" we have from top to bottom we have top + middle = bottom, we might take that to be a general rule. That gives us

9 in bottom left (from right column), then
-11 in top left (from NW-SE diagonal), then
32 in centre left (from left column).

I really don't think there's enough information here to make it unambiguous what whoever created this puzzle has in mind; but that's my best guess.

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  • $\begingroup$ Shouldn't that make the top-left -11 rather than 11? $\endgroup$ – Jaap Scherphuis Aug 23 '16 at 12:56
  • $\begingroup$ It should; sorry about that. I've edited my answer. $\endgroup$ – Gareth McCaughan Aug 23 '16 at 13:52

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